Statute of Limitations in Copyright Law

Recently, a commenter posted a link to a petition seeking to remove the statute of limitations on copyright law. Though I had to delete the comment because it was posted in the wrong place, it did get me thinking about the issue of the statute of limitations (SOL) as it applies to copyright law.  

Never having dealt with this aspect of copyright law, my own battle being barely three years old, I began to research it and what I turned up shows that the SOL of copyright is much like the law itself, hopelessly muddled and burderned with excessive complexity.

But, in the end, what I learned was that the SOL is almost certainly no obstacle to anyone wanting to file suit against a potential plagiarist, no copyright holder who acts within reason has anything to fear from it.

What is a Statute of Limitations?

The Wikipedia defines a statute of limitations as "a statute in a common law legal system setting forth the maximum period of time, after certain events, that legal proceedings based on those events may begin"

In simpler terms, an SOL is a time limit that one has to start legal proceedings after an event has occured. If the SOL on a criminal offense is seven years, then prosecuters have until seven years after the crime to charge some one. Similarly, if a SOL on a personal injury case is two years, then the the plaintiff has two years after the injury occurred to file their case.  If you wait until after the SOL has expired, it’s impossible to begin proceedings on the matter and any case regarding it will be thrown out.

SOLs are designed to prevent plaintiffs and prosecutors from "sitting" on a case for a long period of time while memories fade, evidence vanishes and those involved go on about their lives. SOLs are also designed to bring closure to an event, a final day in which no further action may be brought, and also prevent the court system from being overburdened with impossibly old cases.  

The SOL on copyright infringement claims is three years. This has lead many to worry about the possibility of someone infringing on their material and then "hiding" for three years, waiiting until the SOL has run out and they could not be sued.

However, when one delves into the nature of SOL and how it applies to copyright law, it becomes clear that this is not the case nor a very likely possibility.  

The Clock Starts… Here

The question revolving around SOLs isn’t how long they last, that time is absolute, but when the clock starts. With some cases, such as robberies and personal injury matters, it’s pretty straightforward, the clock starts when the act occurs. With copyright infringement claims, the clock does not start until the conclusion of an ongoing infringement.

If an infinging work is posted online, the infringement is ongoing and the clock doesn’t start until after the work has been removed and the infringement ceased. For example, if someone posted a poem of mine six years ago and the poem is still up today, then the clock has not even started, though the infringement began well past the limit of the statute of limitations, I can still sue and can do so for at least three more years. 

It is not a question of whether or not I can sue for copyright infringement, the only question is whether I can claim damages for all six years or just the most recent three. The courts have been split on that matter and either ruling is possible.

If the work was somehow hidden (IE: Search engines didn’t pick it up or it was hidden in a password protected area) the clock starts when the plaintiff either discovered the infringement or when they should have reasonably done so.  This is called "tolling" the SOL.

A situation such as this is analogous to someone discovering years after a car accident that they have a previously undiagnosed injury that needs to be treated, as long as there was no reasonable way they could have known about the injury, the plaintiff may still sue for damages, even if the SOL has long since expired.

When Problems Can Arise

When dealing with plagiarism online, the odds of ever encountering an SOL limitation are slim. Before one can effectively rely on the SOL in their defense, they have to be able to prove two things.

  1. That the copyright infringement has ceased and is no longer ongoing
  2. That you, the copyright holder, have had knowledge or should have had knowledge about the infringement for at least three years and did not act on it.

This means, for example, that I can not sue the first plagiarist I battled since his site was removed over three years ago. However, if he started up another site, unbeknownst to me, I can still take action on that for that and, even if the site had already been taken down but were discovered later, I could also act on that since I had no way of knowing. 

All the SOL does is prevent copyright holders from "sitting" on an old infringement for a long period of time and suing a long time after everything is done. It does not allow thieves to escape detection for a certain period of time and then claim immunity.

This isn’t to say that SOL problems can’t occur, but they are much more likely to come up in the print world where works can be taken in and out of publication. Since courts are unclear about whether the second printing of a book is a continuation of the original infringement or a new one, one could run into SOL trouble there if the infringement were known.

Similarly, an online plagiarist could take down and put up a work repeatedly (perhaps on different sites) and raise the same issue. Once again though, the infringement would have to have been known for a period of three years and not acted upon in that time.  That could provide an extra obstacle to getting damages in such a case, especially damages for the entire span of the infringement.

Conclusions 

In the end, while SOL defences have worked in some copyright infringement cases, those generally dealt with people who did not act on an infringement after it was discovered but, instead, waited until they were dire financial straits to file suit. That is exactly the type of case SOLs are designed to guard against.

The average copyright holder, acting with a reasonable amount of swiftness and determination, will not likely face an SOL  defense with a good chance of success. The intent of the law is to prevent people from waiting to file suit, not allow infringement to escape unpunished. 

Nonetheless, if you have a copyright infringement claim, it’s probably best to discuss the matter with an attorney so he can evaluate how the SOL applies in your case. It is a deciding factor in determining how to handle a copyright matter and only a lawyer can provide a final judgement. 

Sources 

My special thanks goes to these following sites and the individuals that posted the information:

Applying Statutes of Limitations to Internet Offenses by Michael L. Baroni
Copyright Law: Time Waits for No Man by Robert J. Bernstei
Copyright Law Questions by FreeAdvice

(Note: If the poster of the petition wishes to attach it to this piece, I will have no problem with that.) 

[tags]plagiarism, copyright law, copyright infringement, content theft, copyright, statute of limitations, law[/tags]

44 comments
three
three

I agree with one of the other commentators that you are focusing too much on the SOL, instead of when they start running. Once you discover that an infringement has occurred you should act upon it, you can't just sit and wait and contemplate for a couple of years. What I think is actually more critical is access to the legal system. I don' think the SOL are a real problem. What is a more serious problem is that it is too expensive to litigate on smaller cases, especially these type of cases that require injunctive relief and can't really be handled by individuals in small claims. San Diego personal injury attorney

three
three

I agree with one of the other commentators that you are focusing too much on the SOL, instead of when they start running. Once you discover that an infringement has occurred you should act upon it, you can't just sit and wait and contemplate for a couple of years. What I think is actually more critical is access to the legal system. I don' think the SOL are a real problem. What is a more serious problem is that it is too expensive to litigate on smaller cases, especially these type of cases that require injunctive relief and can't really be handled by individuals in small claims. San Diego personal injury attorney

three
three

I agree with one of the other commentators that you are focusing too much on the SOL, instead of when they start running. Once you discover that an infringement has occurred you should act upon it, you can't just sit and wait and contemplate for a couple of years. What I think is actually more critical is access to the legal system. I don' think the SOL are a real problem. What is a more serious problem is that it is too expensive to litigate on smaller cases, especially these type of cases that require injunctive relief and can't really be handled by individuals in small claims. San Diego personal injury attorney

three
three

I agree with one of the other commentators that you are focusing too much on the SOL, instead of when they start running. Once you discover that an infringement has occurred you should act upon it, you can't just sit and wait and contemplate for a couple of years. What I think is actually more critical is access to the legal system. I don' think the SOL are a real problem. What is a more serious problem is that it is too expensive to litigate on smaller cases, especially these type of cases that require injunctive relief and can't really be handled by individuals in small claims. San Diego personal injury attorney

three
three

I agree with one of the other commentators that you are focusing too much on the SOL, instead of when they start running. Once you discover that an infringement has occurred you should act upon it, you can't just sit and wait and contemplate for a couple of years. What I think is actually more critical is access to the legal system. I don' think the SOL are a real problem. What is a more serious problem is that it is too expensive to litigate on smaller cases, especially these type of cases that require injunctive relief and can't really be handled by individuals in small claims. San Diego personal injury attorney

Stoddard White Jr.
Stoddard White Jr.

I am a screenwriter who has been ripped off huge because the laws our legislators have put into law, favor thieves and not hardworking honest sixty to eighty hour a week aspiring screenwriters. These laws that favor the thieves, are in place of our very own Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is amazing that I wasted all of those hours during all of those years in grade school thinking that "The Pledge of Allegience" meant something. These laws do not properly protect writers of intellectual property they protect thieves. My screenplay has been floating around Hollywood for several years. God forbid we miss a movie in a three year span, that has our material in it. I personally am a writer not a movie critic and don't have the luxury of spending endless hours dissecting movies for plagerism. I don't watch many movies because unlike the thieves that are protected by unjust law, I like to keep my work original.

The only job I have been able to attempt to do for the last several years is write. I had a large beniegn tumor that was growing slowly in my neck that I was not aware of for several years. It was misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue. I could not figure out why for only the second time in my life, I was always feeling tired, lacked energy, and was suffering from vertigo. Even after the surgery, I had and still have some problems with concentration, sleep at night, and for sitting for long periods of time. This is not congenial to a normal job. Therefore my days were and are much long in order to accomplish what most people do in an average day and had time for little else. Although I knew that a very successful production company had my screenplay (an associate at a film office handed it to them) they at first only stole my themes, which apparently is not against copyright law. However it certainly ruins the fact that I can no longer put my movies out for several years until that theme dies down. With the little energy I did have, I watched several of their movies with my themes, (six) trying to spot plagerism but found only somewhat relatively minor infractions. I unfortunately missed the movie that had none of my themes but unfortunately one of my best scenes. These scenes were highly unusual with unusual characters and was stolen verbatim: only the names were changed (barely). After finally feeling somewhat better in 2007, and after a meeting at a major studio, I first became aware of the theft from a producer who said this exact scene had already been done. After being forced to rewrite and starting the legal discovery, I also ound out that they had won several national and international awards for my work. They even put the awards ceremony on a special edition of the DVD and the characters that I created were used for twelve out of their thirteen trailers for the television advertising and theatrical releases. They even admitted outwrite to stealing and taking the credit for it in their director's commentary. Although aware of the SOL, I was not aware of the theft, and therefore I may not be able to go back to the time when they made $370,000,000 at just the the box office alone and collect my fair share and then again I may. Thanks to your information I still may have a case since they are still profiting from their DVD and have sold rights to the major cable stations.... this is an on going copyright infringement case... the SOL is bad enough when your healthy let alone dealing with health issues. Labeling it as SOL is so appropriate when it comes to honest Americans dealing with laws that are unconstitutional. The SOL laws ruin honest extremely hardworking American's life's work and livliehoods for generations to come. This ridiculous SOL law also ruins the original authors place in literary and motion picture history, just because they missed the scene that the thief stole until several years later. At least make the SOL thirty years so hard working writers and their families have the time to stop and see who and when our work is stolen or better yet, look to our "Constitution" and the "Bill of Rights" where it mentions intellectual property should last the lifetime of the original author plus ninety years instead of three years?! It takes me three years just to write a good screenplay let alone another six months to a year to try and recover from the theft let alone try to finance a court case when I have doctor bills.

Stoddard White Jr.
Stoddard White Jr.

I am a screenwriter who has been ripped off huge because the laws our legislators have put into law, favor thieves and not hardworking honest sixty to eighty hour a week aspiring screenwriters. These laws that favor the thieves, are in place of our very own Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is amazing that I wasted all of those hours during all of those years in grade school thinking that "The Pledge of Allegience" meant something. These laws do not properly protect writers of intellectual property they protect thieves. My screenplay has been floating around Hollywood for several years. God forbid we miss a movie in a three year span, that has our material in it. I personally am a writer not a movie critic and don't have the luxury of spending endless hours dissecting movies for plagerism. I don't watch many movies because unlike the thieves that are protected by unjust law, I like to keep my work original.

The only job I have been able to attempt to do for the last several years is write. I had a large beniegn tumor that was growing slowly in my neck that I was not aware of for several years. It was misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue. I could not figure out why for only the second time in my life, I was always feeling tired, lacked energy, and was suffering from vertigo. Even after the surgery, I had and still have some problems with concentration, sleep at night, and for sitting for long periods of time. This is not congenial to a normal job. Therefore my days were and are much long in order to accomplish what most people do in an average day and had time for little else. Although I knew that a very successful production company had my screenplay (an associate at a film office handed it to them) they at first only stole my themes, which apparently is not against copyright law. However it certainly ruins the fact that I can no longer put my movies out for several years until that theme dies down. With the little energy I did have, I watched several of their movies with my themes, (six) trying to spot plagerism but found only somewhat relatively minor infractions. I unfortunately missed the movie that had none of my themes but unfortunately one of my best scenes. These scenes were highly unusual with unusual characters and was stolen verbatim: only the names were changed (barely). After finally feeling somewhat better in 2007, and after a meeting at a major studio, I first became aware of the theft from a producer who said this exact scene had already been done. After being forced to rewrite and starting the legal discovery, I also ound out that they had won several national and international awards for my work. They even put the awards ceremony on a special edition of the DVD and the characters that I created were used for twelve out of their thirteen trailers for the television advertising and theatrical releases. They even admitted outwrite to stealing and taking the credit for it in their director's commentary. Although aware of the SOL, I was not aware of the theft, and therefore I may not be able to go back to the time when they made $370,000,000 at just the the box office alone and collect my fair share and then again I may. Thanks to your information I still may have a case since they are still profiting from their DVD and have sold rights to the major cable stations.... this is an on going copyright infringement case... the SOL is bad enough when your healthy let alone dealing with health issues. Labeling it as SOL is so appropriate when it comes to honest Americans dealing with laws that are unconstitutional. The SOL laws ruin honest extremely hardworking American's life's work and livliehoods for generations to come. This ridiculous SOL law also ruins the original authors place in literary and motion picture history, just because they missed the scene that the thief stole until several years later. At least make the SOL thirty years so hard working writers and their families have the time to stop and see who and when our work is stolen or better yet, look to our "Constitution" and the "Bill of Rights" where it mentions intellectual property should last the lifetime of the original author plus ninety years instead of three years?! It takes me three years just to write a good screenplay let alone another six months to a year to try and recover from the theft let alone try to finance a court case when I have doctor bills.

Stoddard White Jr.
Stoddard White Jr.

I am a screenwriter who has been ripped off huge because the laws our legislators have put into law, favor thieves and not hardworking honest sixty to eighty hour a week aspiring screenwriters. These laws that favor the thieves, are in place of our very own Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is amazing that I wasted all of those hours during all of those years in grade school thinking that "The Pledge of Allegience" meant something. These laws do not properly protect writers of intellectual property they protect thieves. My screenplay has been floating around Hollywood for several years. God forbid we miss a movie in a three year span, that has our material in it. I personally am a writer not a movie critic and don't have the luxury of spending endless hours dissecting movies for plagerism. I don't watch many movies because unlike the thieves that are protected by unjust law, I like to keep my work original. The only job I have been able to attempt to do for the last several years is write. I had a large beniegn tumor that was growing slowly in my neck that I was not aware of for several years. It was misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue. I could not figure out why for only the second time in my life, I was always feeling tired, lacked energy, and was suffering from vertigo. Even after the surgery, I had and still have some problems with concentration, sleep at night, and for sitting for long periods of time. This is not congenial to a normal job. Therefore my days were and are much long in order to accomplish what most people do in an average day and had time for little else. Although I knew that a very successful production company had my screenplay (an associate at a film office handed it to them) they at first only stole my themes, which apparently is not against copyright law. However it certainly ruins the fact that I can no longer put my movies out for several years until that theme dies down. With the little energy I did have, I watched several of their movies with my themes, (six) trying to spot plagerism but found only somewhat relatively minor infractions. I unfortunately missed the movie that had none of my themes but unfortunately one of my best scenes. These scenes were highly unusual with unusual characters and was stolen verbatim: only the names were changed (barely). After finally feeling somewhat better in 2007, and after a meeting at a major studio, I first became aware of the theft from a producer who said this exact scene had already been done. After being forced to rewrite and starting the legal discovery, I also ound out that they had won several national and international awards for my work. They even put the awards ceremony on a special edition of the DVD and the characters that I created were used for twelve out of their thirteen trailers for the television advertising and theatrical releases. They even admitted outwrite to stealing and taking the credit for it in their director's commentary. Although aware of the SOL, I was not aware of the theft, and therefore I may not be able to go back to the time when they made $370,000,000 at just the the box office alone and collect my fair share and then again I may. Thanks to your information I still may have a case since they are still profiting from their DVD and have sold rights to the major cable stations.... this is an on going copyright infringement case... the SOL is bad enough when your healthy let alone dealing with health issues. Labeling it as SOL is so appropriate when it comes to honest Americans dealing with laws that are unconstitutional. The SOL laws ruin honest extremely hardworking American's life's work and livliehoods for generations to come. This ridiculous SOL law also ruins the original authors place in literary and motion picture history, just because they missed the scene that the thief stole until several years later. At least make the SOL thirty years so hard working writers and their families have the time to stop and see who and when our work is stolen or better yet, look to our "Constitution" and the "Bill of Rights" where it mentions intellectual property should last the lifetime of the original author plus ninety years instead of three years?! It takes me three years just to write a good screenplay let alone another six months to a year to try and recover from the theft let alone try to finance a court case when I have doctor bills.

Stoddard White Jr.
Stoddard White Jr.

I am a screenwriter who has been ripped off huge because the laws our legislators have put into law, favor thieves and not hardworking honest sixty to eighty hour a week aspiring screenwriters. These laws that favor the thieves, are in place of our very own Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is amazing that I wasted all of those hours during all of those years in grade school thinking that "The Pledge of Allegience" meant something. These laws do not properly protect writers of intellectual property they protect thieves. My screenplay has been floating around Hollywood for several years. God forbid we miss a movie in a three year span, that has our material in it. I personally am a writer not a movie critic and don't have the luxury of spending endless hours dissecting movies for plagerism. I don't watch many movies because unlike the thieves that are protected by unjust law, I like to keep my work original.
The only job I have been able to attempt to do for the last several years is write. I had a large beniegn tumor that was growing slowly in my neck that I was not aware of for several years. It was misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue. I could not figure out why for only the second time in my life, I was always feeling tired, lacked energy, and was suffering from vertigo. Even after the surgery, I had and still have some problems with concentration, sleep at night, and for sitting for long periods of time. This is not congenial to a normal job. Therefore my days were and are much long in order to accomplish what most people do in an average day and had time for little else. Although I knew that a very successful production company had my screenplay (an associate at a film office handed it to them) they at first only stole my themes, which apparently is not against copyright law. However it certainly ruins the fact that I can no longer put my movies out for several years until that theme dies down. With the little energy I did have, I watched several of their movies with my themes, (six) trying to spot plagerism but found only somewhat relatively minor infractions. I unfortunately missed the movie that had none of my themes but unfortunately one of my best scenes. These scenes were highly unusual with unusual characters and was stolen verbatim: only the names were changed (barely). After finally feeling somewhat better in 2007, and after a meeting at a major studio, I first became aware of the theft from a producer who said this exact scene had already been done. After being forced to rewrite and starting the legal discovery, I also ound out that they had won several national and international awards for my work. They even put the awards ceremony on a special edition of the DVD and the characters that I created were used for twelve out of their thirteen trailers for the television advertising and theatrical releases. They even admitted outwrite to stealing and taking the credit for it in their director's commentary. Although aware of the SOL, I was not aware of the theft, and therefore I may not be able to go back to the time when they made $370,000,000 at just the the box office alone and collect my fair share and then again I may. Thanks to your information I still may have a case since they are still profiting from their DVD and have sold rights to the major cable stations.... this is an on going copyright infringement case... the SOL is bad enough when your healthy let alone dealing with health issues. Labeling it as SOL is so appropriate when it comes to honest Americans dealing with laws that are unconstitutional. The SOL laws ruin honest extremely hardworking American's life's work and livliehoods for generations to come. This ridiculous SOL law also ruins the original authors place in literary and motion picture history, just because they missed the scene that the thief stole until several years later. At least make the SOL thirty years so hard working writers and their families have the time to stop and see who and when our work is stolen or better yet, look to our "Constitution" and the "Bill of Rights" where it mentions intellectual property should last the lifetime of the original author plus ninety years instead of three years?! It takes me three years just to write a good screenplay let alone another six months to a year to try and recover from the theft let alone try to finance a court case when I have doctor bills.

Stoddard White Jr.
Stoddard White Jr.

I am a screenwriter who has been ripped off huge because the laws our legislators have put into law, favor thieves and not hardworking honest sixty to eighty hour a week aspiring screenwriters. These laws that favor the thieves, are in place of our very own Constitution and Bill of Rights. It is amazing that I wasted all of those hours during all of those years in grade school thinking that "The Pledge of Allegience" meant something. These laws do not properly protect writers of intellectual property they protect thieves. My screenplay has been floating around Hollywood for several years. God forbid we miss a movie in a three year span, that has our material in it. I personally am a writer not a movie critic and don't have the luxury of spending endless hours dissecting movies for plagerism. I don't watch many movies because unlike the thieves that are protected by unjust law, I like to keep my work original. The only job I have been able to attempt to do for the last several years is write. I had a large beniegn tumor that was growing slowly in my neck that I was not aware of for several years. It was misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue. I could not figure out why for only the second time in my life, I was always feeling tired, lacked energy, and was suffering from vertigo. Even after the surgery, I had and still have some problems with concentration, sleep at night, and for sitting for long periods of time. This is not congenial to a normal job. Therefore my days were and are much long in order to accomplish what most people do in an average day and had time for little else. Although I knew that a very successful production company had my screenplay (an associate at a film office handed it to them) they at first only stole my themes, which apparently is not against copyright law. However it certainly ruins the fact that I can no longer put my movies out for several years until that theme dies down. With the little energy I did have, I watched several of their movies with my themes, (six) trying to spot plagerism but found only somewhat relatively minor infractions. I unfortunately missed the movie that had none of my themes but unfortunately one of my best scenes. These scenes were highly unusual with unusual characters and was stolen verbatim: only the names were changed (barely). After finally feeling somewhat better in 2007, and after a meeting at a major studio, I first became aware of the theft from a producer who said this exact scene had already been done. After being forced to rewrite and starting the legal discovery, I also ound out that they had won several national and international awards for my work. They even put the awards ceremony on a special edition of the DVD and the characters that I created were used for twelve out of their thirteen trailers for the television advertising and theatrical releases. They even admitted outwrite to stealing and taking the credit for it in their director's commentary. Although aware of the SOL, I was not aware of the theft, and therefore I may not be able to go back to the time when they made $370,000,000 at just the the box office alone and collect my fair share and then again I may. Thanks to your information I still may have a case since they are still profiting from their DVD and have sold rights to the major cable stations.... this is an on going copyright infringement case... the SOL is bad enough when your healthy let alone dealing with health issues. Labeling it as SOL is so appropriate when it comes to honest Americans dealing with laws that are unconstitutional. The SOL laws ruin honest extremely hardworking American's life's work and livliehoods for generations to come. This ridiculous SOL law also ruins the original authors place in literary and motion picture history, just because they missed the scene that the thief stole until several years later. At least make the SOL thirty years so hard working writers and their families have the time to stop and see who and when our work is stolen or better yet, look to our "Constitution" and the "Bill of Rights" where it mentions intellectual property should last the lifetime of the original author plus ninety years instead of three years?! It takes me three years just to write a good screenplay let alone another six months to a year to try and recover from the theft let alone try to finance a court case when I have doctor bills.

Darlene
Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

This site claims to have over a million people on it. More than 7000 in my network alone. My Petition has been averaging 10 signatures a day. Civil Rights don't seem to be much of a priority these days. The Government takes them away as they see fit, and everyone sits back and allows it to happen, they only get upset if it affects them personally. Where's the Justice going to come from if not from the people?
Congress could care less. They're probably getting a kick out of watching me fail, so are the Infringers. The large Corporations are going to keep getting richer at the expense of the little guy. Our art, writings, etc... are up for grabs. The lack of signatures and enthusiasm on this subject are appalling. Why don't we just let them take all of our Rights and see who cares then.
Who cares that someone elses rights are being trod upon and then taken away, right?
I've estimated that in order to get the amount of signatures that I felt that I needed to get this through Congress it would take approximately 15 years or more at this rate. I'm determined to get signatures. I've worked hard on this! I researched the Laws for Christs sake, and I have made no difference because of the indifferece of the masses. Why should I bother with this Issue anymore? No one really cares if someone gets ripped off, what matters is that it didn't happen to them.
Every time I believe that things are picking up they come to a screaching halt. It's more than a little bit discouraging, it's heartbreaking. I expected more support on this. I should've just sat back and complained about it. It would've gotten more attention that way, instead I stupidly set out to try to change things. To make a real difference. To make things right.
It's practically the same thing as somebody breaking into your home while you're away and taking whatever they want, except that what they're stealing with Infringement is a part of your very soul. The essence of your existence. Your job, your livelihood, the reason that God put you on this earth for.
I guess the joke is on me, huh?
Let them win. Let them take away our creative ambition, but don't complain when the Writers stop writing, Artists, stop painting,etc... No pictures. No Movies. No Books. No Games. No 'Art' of any kind, where's the entertainment going to come from then?
All of us are affected by it, but no one dare try to save it, all you'll get is opposition.
Next time you watch a movie, play a game, hear a beautiful song, remember the people that made it possible. They're the ones who are getting screwed!
Thank you for those of you who have cared enough to sign.
Respectfully and sincerely, Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

Darlene
Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

This site claims to have over a million people on it. More than 7000 in my network alone. My Petition has been averaging 10 signatures a day. Civil Rights don't seem to be much of a priority these days. The Government takes them away as they see fit, and everyone sits back and allows it to happen, they only get upset if it affects them personally. Where's the Justice going to come from if not from the people?
Congress could care less. They're probably getting a kick out of watching me fail, so are the Infringers. The large Corporations are going to keep getting richer at the expense of the little guy. Our art, writings, etc... are up for grabs. The lack of signatures and enthusiasm on this subject are appalling. Why don't we just let them take all of our Rights and see who cares then.
Who cares that someone elses rights are being trod upon and then taken away, right?
I've estimated that in order to get the amount of signatures that I felt that I needed to get this through Congress it would take approximately 15 years or more at this rate. I'm determined to get signatures. I've worked hard on this! I researched the Laws for Christs sake, and I have made no difference because of the indifferece of the masses. Why should I bother with this Issue anymore? No one really cares if someone gets ripped off, what matters is that it didn't happen to them.
Every time I believe that things are picking up they come to a screaching halt. It's more than a little bit discouraging, it's heartbreaking. I expected more support on this. I should've just sat back and complained about it. It would've gotten more attention that way, instead I stupidly set out to try to change things. To make a real difference. To make things right.
It's practically the same thing as somebody breaking into your home while you're away and taking whatever they want, except that what they're stealing with Infringement is a part of your very soul. The essence of your existence. Your job, your livelihood, the reason that God put you on this earth for.
I guess the joke is on me, huh?
Let them win. Let them take away our creative ambition, but don't complain when the Writers stop writing, Artists, stop painting,etc... No pictures. No Movies. No Books. No Games. No 'Art' of any kind, where's the entertainment going to come from then?
All of us are affected by it, but no one dare try to save it, all you'll get is opposition.
Next time you watch a movie, play a game, hear a beautiful song, remember the people that made it possible. They're the ones who are getting screwed!
Thank you for those of you who have cared enough to sign.
Respectfully and sincerely, Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
This site claims to have over a million people on it. More than 7000 in my network alone. My Petition has been averaging 10 signatures a day. Civil Rights don't seem to be much of a priority these days. The Government takes them away as they see fit, and everyone sits back and allows it to happen, they only get upset if it affects them personally. Where's the Justice going to come from if not from the people?
Congress could care less. They're probably getting a kick out of watching me fail, so are the Infringers. The large Corporations are going to keep getting richer at the expense of the little guy. Our art, writings, etc... are up for grabs. The lack of signatures and enthusiasm on this subject are appalling. Why don't we just let them take all of our Rights and see who cares then.
Who cares that someone elses rights are being trod upon and then taken away, right?
I've estimated that in order to get the amount of signatures that I felt that I needed to get this through Congress it would take approximately 15 years or more at this rate. I'm determined to get signatures. I've worked hard on this! I researched the Laws for Christs sake, and I have made no difference because of the indifferece of the masses. Why should I bother with this Issue anymore? No one really cares if someone gets ripped off, what matters is that it didn't happen to them.
Every time I believe that things are picking up they come to a screaching halt. It's more than a little bit discouraging, it's heartbreaking. I expected more support on this. I should've just sat back and complained about it. It would've gotten more attention that way, instead I stupidly set out to try to change things. To make a real difference. To make things right.
It's practically the same thing as somebody breaking into your home while you're away and taking whatever they want, except that what they're stealing with Infringement is a part of your very soul. The essence of your existence. Your job, your livelihood, the reason that God put you on this earth for.
I guess the joke is on me, huh?
Let them win. Let them take away our creative ambition, but don't complain when the Writers stop writing, Artists, stop painting,etc... No pictures. No Movies. No Books. No Games. No 'Art' of any kind, where's the entertainment going to come from then?
All of us are affected by it, but no one dare try to save it, all you'll get is opposition.
Next time you watch a movie, play a game, hear a beautiful song, remember the people that made it possible. They're the ones who are getting screwed!
Thank you for those of you who have cared enough to sign.
Respectfully and sincerely, Darlene
(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. ) http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759 This site claims to have over a million people on it. More than 7000 in my network alone. My Petition has been averaging 10 signatures a day. Civil Rights don't seem to be much of a priority these days. The Government takes them away as they see fit, and everyone sits back and allows it to happen, they only get upset if it affects them personally. Where's the Justice going to come from if not from the people? Congress could care less. They're probably getting a kick out of watching me fail, so are the Infringers. The large Corporations are going to keep getting richer at the expense of the little guy. Our art, writings, etc... are up for grabs. The lack of signatures and enthusiasm on this subject are appalling. Why don't we just let them take all of our Rights and see who cares then. Who cares that someone elses rights are being trod upon and then taken away, right? I've estimated that in order to get the amount of signatures that I felt that I needed to get this through Congress it would take approximately 15 years or more at this rate. I'm determined to get signatures. I've worked hard on this! I researched the Laws for Christs sake, and I have made no difference because of the indifferece of the masses. Why should I bother with this Issue anymore? No one really cares if someone gets ripped off, what matters is that it didn't happen to them. Every time I believe that things are picking up they come to a screaching halt. It's more than a little bit discouraging, it's heartbreaking. I expected more support on this. I should've just sat back and complained about it. It would've gotten more attention that way, instead I stupidly set out to try to change things. To make a real difference. To make things right. It's practically the same thing as somebody breaking into your home while you're away and taking whatever they want, except that what they're stealing with Infringement is a part of your very soul. The essence of your existence. Your job, your livelihood, the reason that God put you on this earth for. I guess the joke is on me, huh? Let them win. Let them take away our creative ambition, but don't complain when the Writers stop writing, Artists, stop painting,etc... No pictures. No Movies. No Books. No Games. No 'Art' of any kind, where's the entertainment going to come from then? All of us are affected by it, but no one dare try to save it, all you'll get is opposition. Next time you watch a movie, play a game, hear a beautiful song, remember the people that made it possible. They're the ones who are getting screwed! Thank you for those of you who have cared enough to sign. Respectfully and sincerely, Darlene (You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. ) http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494... This site claims to have over a million people on it. More than 7000 in my network alone. My Petition has been averaging 10 signatures a day. Civil Rights don't seem to be much of a priority these days. The Government takes them away as they see fit, and everyone sits back and allows it to happen, they only get upset if it affects them personally. Where's the Justice going to come from if not from the people? Congress could care less. They're probably getting a kick out of watching me fail, so are the Infringers. The large Corporations are going to keep getting richer at the expense of the little guy. Our art, writings, etc... are up for grabs. The lack of signatures and enthusiasm on this subject are appalling. Why don't we just let them take all of our Rights and see who cares then.Who cares that someone elses rights are being trod upon and then taken away, right?I've estimated that in order to get the amount of signatures that I felt that I needed to get this through Congress it would take approximately 15 years or more at this rate. I'm determined to get signatures. I've worked hard on this! I researched the Laws for Christs sake, and I have made no difference because of the indifferece of the masses. Why should I bother with this Issue anymore? No one really cares if someone gets ripped off, what matters is that it didn't happen to them.Every time I believe that things are picking up they come to a screaching halt. It's more than a little bit discouraging, it's heartbreaking. I expected more support on this. I should've just sat back and complained about it. It would've gotten more attention that way, instead I stupidly set out to try to change things. To make a real difference. To make things right. It's practically the same thing as somebody breaking into your home while you're away and taking whatever they want, except that what they're stealing with Infringement is a part of your very soul. The essence of your existence. Your job, your livelihood, the reason that God put you on this earth for.I guess the joke is on me, huh?Let them win. Let them take away our creative ambition, but don't complain when the Writers stop writing, Artists, stop painting,etc... No pictures. No Movies. No Books. No Games. No 'Art' of any kind, where's the entertainment going to come from then?All of us are affected by it, but no one dare try to save it, all you'll get is opposition.Next time you watch a movie, play a game, hear a beautiful song, remember the people that made it possible. They're the ones who are getting screwed!Thank you for those of you who have cared enough to sign.Respectfully and sincerely, Darlene(You have my Permission to copy the heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

Darlene
Darlene

Protect your work from theft!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

We, the Undersigned, endorse the following petition:
Copyright - Get Rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations
Target: Congress

Our 'Protected Rights' are supposed to be for 70 years after our death, they have drastically reduced this to a mere 3 years, and that's only if we catch someone stealing our writings, art, etc..., in time to file a Lawsuit.

The STATUTE of LIMITATIONS has no place in our society as it promotes Infringement, and proves that our Laws don't work for US.

Please help to restore our Copyright Protections to,
"70 years past Death, not 3 years past theft"

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Remember to add your home address, as it may be required to get this through Congress.

(You have my Permission to copy this heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
__________________
Help get rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations on Copyrights - Protect your Art!
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

Protect your work from theft!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

We, the Undersigned, endorse the following petition:
Copyright - Get Rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations
Target: Congress

Our 'Protected Rights' are supposed to be for 70 years after our death, they have drastically reduced this to a mere 3 years, and that's only if we catch someone stealing our writings, art, etc..., in time to file a Lawsuit.

The STATUTE of LIMITATIONS has no place in our society as it promotes Infringement, and proves that our Laws don't work for US.

Please help to restore our Copyright Protections to,
"70 years past Death, not 3 years past theft"

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Remember to add your home address, as it may be required to get this through Congress.

(You have my Permission to copy this heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...
__________________
Help get rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations on Copyrights - Protect your Art!
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

Darlene
Darlene

Protect your work from theft!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
We, the Undersigned, endorse the following petition:
Copyright - Get Rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations
Target: Congress
Our 'Protected Rights' are supposed to be for 70 years after our death, they have drastically reduced this to a mere 3 years, and that's only if we catch someone stealing our writings, art, etc..., in time to file a Lawsuit.
The STATUTE of LIMITATIONS has no place in our society as it promotes Infringement, and proves that our Laws don't work for US.
Please help to restore our Copyright Protections to,
"70 years past Death, not 3 years past theft"
Thank you for your time and consideration.
Remember to add your home address, as it may be required to get this through Congress.
(You have my Permission to copy this heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
__________________
Help get rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations on Copyrights - Protect your Art!
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

Protect your work from theft! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759 We, the Undersigned, endorse the following petition: Copyright - Get Rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations Target: Congress Our 'Protected Rights' are supposed to be for 70 years after our death, they have drastically reduced this to a mere 3 years, and that's only if we catch someone stealing our writings, art, etc..., in time to file a Lawsuit. The STATUTE of LIMITATIONS has no place in our society as it promotes Infringement, and proves that our Laws don't work for US. Please help to restore our Copyright Protections to, "70 years past Death, not 3 years past theft" Thank you for your time and consideration. Remember to add your home address, as it may be required to get this through Congress. (You have my Permission to copy this heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. ) http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759 __________________ Help get rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations on Copyrights - Protect your Art! http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759

Darlene
Darlene

Protect your work from theft! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494... We, the Undersigned, endorse the following petition:Copyright - Get Rid of the 3-year Statute of LimitationsTarget: CongressOur 'Protected Rights' are supposed to be for 70 years after our death, they have drastically reduced this to a mere 3 years, and that's only if we catch someone stealing our writings, art, etc..., in time to file a Lawsuit.The STATUTE of LIMITATIONS has no place in our society as it promotes Infringement, and proves that our Laws don't work for US. Please help to restore our Copyright Protections to, "70 years past Death, not 3 years past theft"Thank you for your time and consideration.Remember to add your home address, as it may be required to get this through Congress.(You have my Permission to copy this heading from 'We the undersigned, etc...' to the end of the url of this Petition and to distribute it in an effort to obtain signatures to change this Law. )http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...__________________ Help get rid of the 3-year Statute of Limitations on Copyrights - Protect your Art! http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov):

§ 507. Limitations on actions

(a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose.

(b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued.

I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose.

Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth.

For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov):§ 507. Limitations on actions(a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose.(b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued.I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose.Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth.For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov):

§ 507. Limitations on actions

(a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose.

(b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued.

I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose.

Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth.

For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov):
§ 507. Limitations on actions
(a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose.
(b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued.
I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose.
Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth.
For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov): § 507. Limitations on actions (a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose. (b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued. I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose. Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth. For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

JB
JB

Here's how the law sits today on the copyright Web site (copyright.gov):

§ 507. Limitations on actions

(a) Criminal Proceedings. - Except as expressly provided otherwise in this title, no criminal proceeding shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within 5 years after the cause of action arose.

(b) Civil Actions. - No civil action shall be maintained under the provisions of this title unless it is commenced within three years after the claim accrued.

I believe what's going on is a genuine misunderstanding. I focus solely on civil law, where you can plainly see that the SOL begins after the claim has accrued (or rather, finished accruing). The Criminal law is where the SOL begins after the action arose.

Any action you take will be a civil matter. Realistically, almost no one is charged wth criminal copyright infringement. Even the RIAA doesn't do that. Criminal prosecution is reserved for the most heinous of copyright infringers, people that make and sell bootleg videos, books and so forth.

For the record, the Copyright site was last updated in 2004.

Darlene
Darlene

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."

The first link was inserted because that is what it stated to be fair. I am stating that this is Un-Constitutional and that our Rights should revert this back to 'The Constitution', and the 'Bill of Rights', giving us the full 70 years after death, not a mere 3 years after theft.

The quoted link was replaced by Congress in 2003. The other links in this post show that this has changed!!!
Accrued, arose. The Infringement didn't cease. The Laws state that 'No action can be taken,' the Infringement still exists, but the Law will no longer allow any claim for your Rights to your work.

Accrued, and arose are past tense because it reverts back to when the actual theft occurred.

Both links are from The Department of Justice, the new link shows that "the last infringing act" no longer exists. It was replaced with 'arose.'
Congress made things even harder with their Law changes.

The Actual Laws.
They are in the Links, you can even save them for future reference.

You are given the opportunity to download the Copyright Laws with one of the supplied links. The Irony, if you can see it, is that the Laws aren't Protected by Copyright, but the 'Fair Use Doctrine' applies.

Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!

"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"

"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"
__________________
.
! - Strike the 3-year Statute of Limitations.

@CARE2.com
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...
There is no charge and you can remain anonymous to the Public. Please do not forget to put your email and home addresses on the Petition. They will not be seen by the Public, but I don't believe Congress will accept the Petition without them.
Thank you for your time and consideration.

Darlene
Darlene

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."

The first link was inserted because that is what it stated to be fair. I am stating that this is Un-Constitutional and that our Rights should revert this back to 'The Constitution', and the 'Bill of Rights', giving us the full 70 years after death, not a mere 3 years after theft.

The quoted link was replaced by Congress in 2003. The other links in this post show that this has changed!!!
Accrued, arose. The Infringement didn't cease. The Laws state that 'No action can be taken,' the Infringement still exists, but the Law will no longer allow any claim for your Rights to your work.

Accrued, and arose are past tense because it reverts back to when the actual theft occurred.

Both links are from The Department of Justice, the new link shows that "the last infringing act" no longer exists. It was replaced with 'arose.'
Congress made things even harder with their Law changes.

The Actual Laws.
They are in the Links, you can even save them for future reference.

You are given the opportunity to download the Copyright Laws with one of the supplied links. The Irony, if you can see it, is that the Laws aren't Protected by Copyright, but the 'Fair Use Doctrine' applies.

Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!

"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"

"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"
__________________
.
! - Strike the 3-year Statute of Limitations.

@CARE2.com
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
There is no charge and you can remain anonymous to the Public. Please do not forget to put your email and home addresses on the Petition. They will not be seen by the Public, but I don't believe Congress will accept the Petition without them.
Thank you for your time and consideration.

Darlene
Darlene

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."@CARE2.com
The first link was inserted because that is what it stated to be fair. I am stating that this is Un-Constitutional and that our Rights should revert this back to 'The Constitution', and the 'Bill of Rights', giving us the full 70 years after death, not a mere 3 years after theft.
The quoted link was replaced by Congress in 2003. The other links in this post show that this has changed!!!
Accrued, arose. The Infringement didn't cease. The Laws state that 'No action can be taken,' the Infringement still exists, but the Law will no longer allow any claim for your Rights to your work.
Accrued, and arose are past tense because it reverts back to when the actual theft occurred.
Both links are from The Department of Justice, the new link shows that "the last infringing act" no longer exists. It was replaced with 'arose.'
Congress made things even harder with their Law changes.
The Actual Laws.
They are in the Links, you can even save them for future reference.
You are given the opportunity to download the Copyright Laws with one of the supplied links. The Irony, if you can see it, is that the Laws aren't Protected by Copyright, but the 'Fair Use Doctrine' applies.
Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!
"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"
"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"
__________________
.
! - Strike the 3-year Statute of Limitations.

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759
There is no charge and you can remain anonymous to the Public. Please do not forget to put your email and home addresses on the Petition. They will not be seen by the Public, but I don't believe Congress will accept the Petition without them.
Thank you for your time and consideration.

Darlene
Darlene

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act." The first link was inserted because that is what it stated to be fair. I am stating that this is Un-Constitutional and that our Rights should revert this back to 'The Constitution', and the 'Bill of Rights', giving us the full 70 years after death, not a mere 3 years after theft. The quoted link was replaced by Congress in 2003. The other links in this post show that this has changed!!! Accrued, arose. The Infringement didn't cease. The Laws state that 'No action can be taken,' the Infringement still exists, but the Law will no longer allow any claim for your Rights to your work. Accrued, and arose are past tense because it reverts back to when the actual theft occurred. Both links are from The Department of Justice, the new link shows that "the last infringing act" no longer exists. It was replaced with 'arose.' Congress made things even harder with their Law changes. The Actual Laws. They are in the Links, you can even save them for future reference. You are given the opportunity to download the Copyright Laws with one of the supplied links. The Irony, if you can see it, is that the Laws aren't Protected by Copyright, but the 'Fair Use Doctrine' applies. Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day! "http://www.copyright.gov/laws/" "http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm" __________________ . ! - Strike the 3-year Statute of Limitations. @CARE2.com http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759 There is no charge and you can remain anonymous to the Public. Please do not forget to put your email and home addresses on the Petition. They will not be seen by the Public, but I don't believe Congress will accept the Petition without them. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Darlene
Darlene

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."The first link was inserted because that is what it stated to be fair. I am stating that this is Un-Constitutional and that our Rights should revert this back to 'The Constitution', and the 'Bill of Rights', giving us the full 70 years after death, not a mere 3 years after theft.The quoted link was replaced by Congress in 2003. The other links in this post show that this has changed!!!Accrued, arose. The Infringement didn't cease. The Laws state that 'No action can be taken,' the Infringement still exists, but the Law will no longer allow any claim for your Rights to your work.Accrued, and arose are past tense because it reverts back to when the actual theft occurred.Both links are from The Department of Justice, the new link shows that "the last infringing act" no longer exists. It was replaced with 'arose.'Congress made things even harder with their Law changes.The Actual Laws.They are in the Links, you can even save them for future reference.You are given the opportunity to download the Copyright Laws with one of the supplied links. The Irony, if you can see it, is that the Laws aren't Protected by Copyright, but the 'Fair Use Doctrine' applies.Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/""http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"__________________.! - Strike the 3-year Statute of Limitations.@CARE2.comhttp://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/26494...There is no charge and you can remain anonymous to the Public. Please do not forget to put your email and home addresses on the Petition. They will not be seen by the Public, but I don't believe Congress will accept the Petition without them.Thank you for your time and consideration.

Jonathan Bailey
Jonathan Bailey

From your own link: "In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act." In the case of Internet works, that is three years AFTER the work is removed. You are focusing on the wrong thing. You are seeing how long the SOL is, not when the clock starts running. Even your own words prove the point. Arose and occured are both past tense indicating that the infringement is over. Even if the infringement does end, tolling an SOL is very common practice in the event the plaintiff could not have been aware that they had been injured. You don't have to be psychic, the court doesn't expect that of you and I have not found one case where an SOL defense worked in which the plaintiff did not wait despite knowing of the infringement. Furthermore, the link has no merit in this case as it deals with CRIMINAL copyright matters. We're interested in civil matters. Think about it logically for a second. Many file sharers that were sued by the RIAA had been sharing for well over three years. How were they successfully sued if they so easily could have played an SOL defense? Finally, I strongly suggest that you take a look at this page in the Wikipedia which sums up the situation nicely. "...a civil suit for copyright infringement can only be brought within three years "after the claim accrued." A claim accrues every time a work is illegally copied and every time an infringing work is illegally sold or transferred, so statute of limitations defenses are usually very difficult" There are many things wrong with copyright law and I will gladly fight with you to change them. It is an unfair and biased system with many flaws. However, simply put, this is not one of them. I'm sorry.

Jonathan Bailey
Jonathan Bailey

From your own link:

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."

In the case of Internet works, that is three years AFTER the work is removed. You are focusing on the wrong thing. You are seeing how long the SOL is, not when the clock starts running.

Even your own words prove the point. Arose and occured are both past tense indicating that the infringement is over. Even if the infringement does end, tolling an SOL is very common practice in the event the plaintiff could not have been aware that they had been injured.

You don't have to be psychic, the court doesn't expect that of you and I have not found one case where an SOL defense worked in which the plaintiff did not wait despite knowing of the infringement.

Furthermore, the link has no merit in this case as it deals with CRIMINAL copyright matters. We're interested in civil matters.

Think about it logically for a second. Many file sharers that were sued by the RIAA had been sharing for well over three years. How were they successfully sued if they so easily could have played an SOL defense?

Finally, I strongly suggest that you take a look at this page in the Wikipedia which sums up the situation nicely. "...a civil suit for copyright infringement can only be brought within three years "after the claim accrued." A claim accrues every time a work is illegally copied and every time an infringing work is illegally sold or transferred, so statute of limitations defenses are usually very difficult"

There are many things wrong with copyright law and I will gladly fight with you to change them. It is an unfair and biased system with many flaws. However, simply put, this is not one of them. I'm sorry.

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines.

"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"

"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"

The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003
check out Limitations on Actions # 507
For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words;
Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words.

From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about.

I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S.
Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law.
Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection.
Your assumptions are wrong.
Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard.

I know I'm right, I've done my homework.
Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines.

"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"

"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"

The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003
check out Limitations on Actions # 507
For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words;
Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words.

From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about.

I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S.
Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law.
Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection.
Your assumptions are wrong.
Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard.

I know I'm right, I've done my homework.
Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines.
"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"
"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"
The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003
check out Limitations on Actions # 507
For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words;
Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words.
From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about.
I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S.
Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law.
Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection.
Your assumptions are wrong.
Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard.
I know I'm right, I've done my homework.
Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!
Thank you for your time and consideration.
Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines. "http://www.copyright.gov/laws/" "http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm" The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003 check out Limitations on Actions # 507 For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words; Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words. From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about. I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S. Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law. Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection. Your assumptions are wrong. Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard. I know I'm right, I've done my homework. Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day! Thank you for your time and consideration. Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Jonathan Bailey
Jonathan Bailey

From your own link: "In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act." In the case of Internet works, that is three years AFTER the work is removed. You are focusing on the wrong thing. You are seeing how long the SOL is, not when the clock starts running. Even your own words prove the point. Arose and occured are both past tense indicating that the infringement is over. Even if the infringement does end, tolling an SOL is very common practice in the event the plaintiff could not have been aware that they had been injured. You don't have to be psychic, the court doesn't expect that of you and I have not found one case where an SOL defense worked in which the plaintiff did not wait despite knowing of the infringement. Furthermore, the link has no merit in this case as it deals with CRIMINAL copyright matters. We're interested in civil matters. Think about it logically for a second. Many file sharers that were sued by the RIAA had been sharing for well over three years. How were they successfully sued if they so easily could have played an SOL defense? Finally, I strongly suggest that you take a look at this page in the Wikipedia which sums up the situation nicely. "...a civil suit for copyright infringement can only be brought within three years "after the claim accrued." A claim accrues every time a work is illegally copied and every time an infringing work is illegally sold or transferred, so statute of limitations defenses are usually very difficult" There are many things wrong with copyright law and I will gladly fight with you to change them. It is an unfair and biased system with many flaws. However, simply put, this is not one of them. I'm sorry.

Jonathan Bailey
Jonathan Bailey

From your own link:

"In copyright infringement actions, the period of limitation begins on the date of the last infringing act."

In the case of Internet works, that is three years AFTER the work is removed. You are focusing on the wrong thing. You are seeing how long the SOL is, not when the clock starts running.

Even your own words prove the point. Arose and occured are both past tense indicating that the infringement is over. Even if the infringement does end, tolling an SOL is very common practice in the event the plaintiff could not have been aware that they had been injured.

You don't have to be psychic, the court doesn't expect that of you and I have not found one case where an SOL defense worked in which the plaintiff did not wait despite knowing of the infringement.

Furthermore, the link has no merit in this case as it deals with CRIMINAL copyright matters. We're interested in civil matters.

Think about it logically for a second. Many file sharers that were sued by the RIAA had been sharing for well over three years. How were they successfully sued if they so easily could have played an SOL defense?

Finally, I strongly suggest that you take a look at this page in the Wikipedia which sums up the situation nicely. "...a civil suit for copyright infringement can only be brought within three years "after the claim accrued." A claim accrues every time a work is illegally copied and every time an infringing work is illegally sold or transferred, so statute of limitations defenses are usually very difficult"

There are many things wrong with copyright law and I will gladly fight with you to change them. It is an unfair and biased system with many flaws. However, simply put, this is not one of them. I'm sorry.

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines.

"http://www.copyright.gov/laws/"

"http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"

The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003
check out Limitations on Actions # 507
For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words;
Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words.

From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about.

I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S.
Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law.
Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection.
Your assumptions are wrong.
Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard.

I know I'm right, I've done my homework.
Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day!

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Darlene
Darlene

Read between the lines. "http://www.copyright.gov/laws/""http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intell_prop_rts/toc.htm"The first link will take you to the Laws that went into affect in 2003check out Limitations on Actions # 507For this link take out your dictionary and look up the words;Accrued and arose, basically they are the same words.From the second link you go to Criminal Remedies for Copyright Infringement, scroll down to Section - E. Statute of Limitations and click on the E. You'll see what I'm talking about. I have spoken to Attorneys in at least 5 different States in the U.S.Many of them from each Respective State. I've researched the Laws extensively. Now I understand why I was told not to try to change this law. Instead of reading on the subject enough to come to a logical conclusion some people would rather disregard the actual evidence of the laws, and until matters like these are taken seriously there will be no protection. Your assumptions are wrong.Attorneys don't like fighting Large Corporations that have proven by their past behavior to drag the case on endlessly. The Corporations have the money, the Attorneys would rather not tap out their resources even if you have a 'Legitimate claim' with factual evidence. It's easier to just disregard. I know I'm right, I've done my homework.Good luck with your Projects, and have a great day! Thank you for your time and consideration.Follow the link for the full Petition.. You can help to make a difference. Thanks you, and have a great day! "http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/264941759"

Hendu
Hendu

Generally, statutes of limitation begin to run upon discovery of the infringement, or when a reasonable person should have discovered the infringement.

Hendu
Hendu

Generally, statutes of limitation begin to run upon discovery of the infringement, or when a reasonable person should have discovered the infringement.

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  1. [...] intangible questions whether the case was properly decided. PlagiarismToday presents an overview of copyright infringement and the statute of [...]

  2. [...] While most works won’t need this kind of protection after two years, especially with the statute of limitations for copyright infringement being what it is, there are situations where a paid registration could expire before the dispute [...]

  3. [...] For copyright, that statute of limitations is three years after the infringement has stopped. However, in cases where the victim was unaware of the infringement, that time frame can be “tolled” and extended to when he or she did learn of the infringement. [...]