3 Count: Getting Gawked

Have any suggestions for the 3 Count? Let me know via Twitter @plagiarismtoday.

1: Gawker Removes Leaked Sarah Palin Book Excerpts

First off today, Gawker media was forced to remove excerpts from Sarah Palin’s unreleased second book from its namesake blog after a copyright complaint by Palin’s publisher Harper Collins. Palin had seen the excerpts and tweeted about them, prompting another blog post from Gawker making fun of Palin’s displeasure, but Harper Collins filed suit against Gawker on Friday and received a court order that brought the excerpts down pending a cout hearing on the 30th. Gawker will most likely attempt to claim fair use in the excerpts but may have an uphill battle as unpublished works are granted greater protection.

2: “Put Up or Shut Up” Time for US Copyright Group

Next up today, the judge overseeing the U.S. Copyright Groups’ litigation against thousands of suspected file sharers may be running out of patience. With thousands of potential defendants already having been named by their ISPs, having received a settlement letter and not being named in the suit, the judge has given the group until December 6 to name those that it wished to sue in that court, an indication that the court is losing patience with the process. The U.S. Copyright Group had requested an extension of five years as the court had ruled Time Warner, a major ISP, was only required to send a few contacts per month, requiring five years for them to complete the entire list, but the judge ruled that would be unfair to the defendants who had already been named by their ISPs.

3: Daily Mail Accused of Copyright Infringement, Once Again

Finally today, the London newspaper the Daily Mail is in copyright hot water again after another photographer has found his photo being used on the paper’s site without permission or payment. The paper recently found itself in a lawsuit with another photographer, where the paper famously claimed that, since the image was distributed over TwitPic, that they had been given an implied license to use it. Most legal experts find that to be a stretch of an argument though the case is being closely watched.

Suggestions

That’s it for the three count today. We will be back tomorrow with three more copyright links. If you have a link that you want to suggest a link for the column or have any proposals to make it better. Feel free to leave a comment or send me an email. I hope to hear from you.

Want the Full Story?

Tune in every Wednesday evening at 6 PM ET for the live recording of the Copyright 2.0 Show or wait and get the edited version Friday right here on Plagiarism Today.

The 3 Count Logo was created by Justin Goff and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License.