Artists Express Concern Over PhotoBucket

PhotoBucket LogoPhotoBucket, the Web’s largest image sharing service, has been drawing criticism from a growing number of artists over its practices regarding copyrighted material.

At issue specifically are two elements of PhotoBucket’s services. First, their image printing service, which is powered by Qoop, and second, their takedown system, which often leaves the work available on other parts of the site.

Some of the artists have banded together by creating a petition directed at PhotoBucket, which I helped author, asking them to change some of their policies to help better protect artists and photographers whose works are being posted, and even sold, on the service.

What makes this case unique is that the artists have not just specific concerns, but also specific solutions to the problem and have requested that PhotoBucket take a series of steps to help ensure that their rights are protected.

Buying Prints

The first complaint deals with PhotoBucket’s relationship with print-on-demand service Qoop.

Qoop works with other image sharing sites, including Flickr and Webshots, but at those sites the relationship is a bit different. Elsewhere, users can only request prints of their own photographs. however, with PhotoBucket, strangers can access users accounts, including those not logged in to the site, and request prints. All that they need is the “Share” URL, which is available in most search results.

Buy PrintsThis feature of PhotoBucket is not mentioned clearly in any of the marketing materials. Nowhere on the front page of the site or the registration page does PhotoBucket mention that, by default, prints of your work will be available to anyone finds your account.

Furthermore, PhotoBucket does not mention in any clear location that the way to prevent this from happening is to set your account to private or not display the “Share” URL under your images. This creates a very worrisome situation where not only are artists likely having their works printed after being uploaded without permission, but also photos being uploaded in the intended manner can be printed by complete strangers.

PhotoBucket MarketingFew, I doubt, would be comfortable with a stranger printing a calendar based upon their family photos and this raises many unsettling possibilities.

Artists, however, also have to contend with Qoop’s printing service. Qoop does not make any attempt to filter out infringing material from their service, other than providing a standard terms of service and presenting warnings to the user. One artist, Sandi Baker of Wolf Song Studio tested this by logging into visiting a strangers account (she did not log into PB in any regard), one who had uploaded some of her images without permission, and printed several stickers of her own work, seen right.

All of this without her explicit permission or the permission of the person who created the account.

StickersHowever, if an effective take down regime were in place at PhotoBucket, this problem might be significantly lessened. Unfortunately, as many artists have discovered, the take down system at PhotoBucket does little to actually stop distribution of their work.

Take Down Problems

Though all of the artists who have filed takedown notices with PhotoBucket agree that the staff is friendly and efficient, the problem is that takedowns rarely remove the work from the site.

Several artists have reported that their images are reuploaded, often within minutes. This often takes place through a series of spam-like accounts owned by usernames that contain a large amount of numbers and don’t seem likely to have been created by a human being.

However, filing a takedown of an image does not result in removal of all copies of the work, just the specific one mentioned. Given that there are over four billion images on PhotoBucket and the difficulties in search for images on the Web, especially if the title has been changed, it is unlikely that an artist can find all or even most copies of their image.

Many artists feel that, between the other copies of the work and the reuploading of removed images, that filing takedown notices with PhotoBucket is almost completely. It is impossible to remove an image, especially one that is popular with PhotoBucket’s users, from the service.

However, the answer to this problem might actually rest with PhotoBucket’s parent company Myspace as they have already cracked this problem, at least as it applies to video.

Solutions

According to the artists, the issue of photo printing can be greatly mitigated by limiting access to the service. The default setting for the printing feature should be set to “off”. This can be achieved initially by ensuring that all PhotoBucket accounts are initially set to private and are only turned to public with the express understanding that it enables printing.

A more permanent solution, however, would be to turn off the printing service itself, unless specifically requested, and limiting it to the user’s own account. Exceptions might be available in cases where well-known artists use PhotoBucket, such as with director accounts on YouTube, but those accounts would carry special rules and require more effort to create.

Though such a system would still enable users to grab an image they wanted to print, upload it to their own account and print the image, limiting the access to the feature greatly reduces the number of people who can produce prints and ensures that the person who requested the image is also the original infringer. This eliminates much of the “innocent infringer” argument and prevents people from accidentally making works available for commercial printing.

Regarding the takedown system, PhotoBucket’s parent company Myspace introduced a “Take Down Stay Down” system for their video offerings in May of last year.

The system works by taking a fingerprint of any video that a takdown is requested for and comparing it against all future uploads. If the video matches, the upload is blocked preventing the work from reappearing on the site.

Theoretically, such a system could easily be applied to images. Once a takedown of an image is requested and a counter-notice seems unlikely, the image could be fingerprinted, compared against other images on the service and against other uploads. If other copies are detected, they are either removed or blocked, meaning that the artist need only submit one DMCA notice to secure the removal of all of their images.

This would likely service PhotoBucket as well as the artists as, most likely, the majority of PhotoBucket’s DMCA complaints stem from a small group of artists dealing with a relatively finite number of pictures.

The technology for such a system already exists and can even detect if the image has been reduced, cropped or otherwise trivially edited. It is at least technically possible for Myspace and PhotoBucket alike to implement such a system.

Conclusions

There is little doubt among the artists that PhotoBucket is a good service and was built with the best of intentions. However, the service is having some unintended consequences and needs to be adjusted to make sure that rampant copyright infringement does not harm the reputation of the service with its target audience, artists and photographers.

There is no desire to “kill” PhotoBucket or to hinder the usefulness of the service for its millions of legitimate users. However, there is a growing expression of concern regarding the service.

As of this writing, the petition is closing in on fifty signatures despite being up less than 24 hours (Update: 10 PM CT Currently at 575 signatures). All of the signatories of the petition are visual artists, many of whom have had their works abused by PhotoBucket members. The current list includes many well-known artists, especially in the airbrush art communities.

Hopefully Photobucket will see these issues and make the needed changes before it is too late. Otherwise, it is only a matter of time before the artists get more hostile towards the service and both the reputation of PhotoBucket and of its legitimate members starts to suffer.

But most importantly, the artists are trying to avoid a situation where others are tempted to try the Viacom route and simply go after PhotoBucket in court. That is not in anyone’s best interest.

With that in mind though, Myspace does not tolerate these types of issues with their video offerings and should not tolerate them with their image offerings either. Art and photography, though not always backed with the most powerful lawyers, are no less creative and require no less effort than video. They are also no less protected.

Still images deserve the same protections as videos. Let us hope that Myspace and PhotoBucket see it the same way.

195 Responses to Artists Express Concern Over PhotoBucket

  1. I especially like the "Take Down Stay Down" idea. This would eliminate a lot of hastle on both ends, I'm sure.~D~

  2. Marcus Ranum says:

    I get a lot of my stuff ripped onto photobucket; just cleaning it up is a major time-waster for me.The idea of fingerprinting images is silly. Anyone with irfanview or some batch image decompression/recompression tool can get around it with a single mouse-click. Unfortunately, these problems will simply not go away as long as it's possible for a user to create new accounts as fast as their old ones are closed. Sites like Ebay have invested a tremendous amount of time and effort adjusting the balance of their "economy" to figure out where the pain points are. You need to create complicating externalities (like: you forfeit your sign-in and membership fees, or lose your current auctions but still have to pay for them, etc) that prevent sockpuppetry.For example, if photobucket didn't allow print from accounts that hadn't been paid for (and the account subscription fee is then held hostage) – the problem would simply move to somplace else.Consider that this may be the cost of extending human nature into cyberspace. People suck; that's not going to change.

  3. I especially like the "Take Down Stay Down" idea. This would eliminate a lot of hastle on both ends, I'm sure.

    ~D~

  4. I especially like the "Take Down Stay Down" idea. This would eliminate a lot of hastle on both ends, I'm sure.~D~

  5. Marcus Ranum says:

    I get a lot of my stuff ripped onto photobucket; just cleaning it up is a major time-waster for me.

    The idea of fingerprinting images is silly. Anyone with irfanview or some batch image decompression/recompression tool can get around it with a single mouse-click. Unfortunately, these problems will simply not go away as long as it's possible for a user to create new accounts as fast as their old ones are closed. Sites like Ebay have invested a tremendous amount of time and effort adjusting the balance of their "economy" to figure out where the pain points are. You need to create complicating externalities (like: you forfeit your sign-in and membership fees, or lose your current auctions but still have to pay for them, etc) that prevent sockpuppetry.

    For example, if photobucket didn't allow print from accounts that hadn't been paid for (and the account subscription fee is then held hostage) – the problem would simply move to somplace else.

    Consider that this may be the cost of extending human nature into cyberspace. People suck; that's not going to change.

  6. Marcus Ranum says:

    I get a lot of my stuff ripped onto photobucket; just cleaning it up is a major time-waster for me.The idea of fingerprinting images is silly. Anyone with irfanview or some batch image decompression/recompression tool can get around it with a single mouse-click. Unfortunately, these problems will simply not go away as long as it's possible for a user to create new accounts as fast as their old ones are closed. Sites like Ebay have invested a tremendous amount of time and effort adjusting the balance of their "economy" to figure out where the pain points are. You need to create complicating externalities (like: you forfeit your sign-in and membership fees, or lose your current auctions but still have to pay for them, etc) that prevent sockpuppetry.For example, if photobucket didn't allow print from accounts that hadn't been paid for (and the account subscription fee is then held hostage) – the problem would simply move to somplace else.Consider that this may be the cost of extending human nature into cyberspace. People suck; that's not going to change.

  7. Stephen: Thank you for stopping by!Eldris: I think a lot of this might have to do with short-sightedness. A lot of companies create features with a combination profit/service motive and don't realize how it can be abused. Let's hope that is the case.Dorothy: The idea has worked well before, let us hope it can work out here!Meredith: I can understand completely. Please let me know if there is anything that I can do to help!Marcus: I have to first correct you and say that you can not defeat solid fingerprinting through trivial editing. This depends on the quality of the software, but many apps are not fooled by cropping, rotation, resizing, etc. Regarding your "pain point" idea, I have agree that is a good point but I am not really sure how well that works with the PB system. YouTube has managed to create one by limiting the uploads on non director accounts, but even director accounts are still free, it is just a matter of surrendering more personal information.This is something PB is going to have to work on in addition to these issues. However, if there is one thing that this whole ordeal has taught me it is that, while some people do suck, most people don't. I do have faith that the good guys still outnumber the bad.DeathNoteGurl: Thank you for stopping by! Please let me know if I can help in any way!Kara: I agree completely. Hopefully with this much momentum behind us, we can push PB to rethink their policies.Danni: Lol. Things picked up pretty quick shortly after this post went up. So many artists have really taken this issue to heart and have started to get the word out. I am completely floored by this response. I'm going to update the article, but it is already at 550. Everyone: Thank you so much for your support and your help! I greatly appreciate all that you have done on this matter. I can not express how overwhelming this response has been.

  8. Kara Lach says:

    Jonathan: Yup a lot of the big artists on DevART have put the word out and they have a lot of watchers who in turn will put news out too. Hopefully we'll get the numbers up into the 1000's soon.

  9. Stephen: Thank you for stopping by!Eldris: I think a lot of this might have to do with short-sightedness. A lot of companies create features with a combination profit/service motive and don't realize how it can be abused. Let's hope that is the case.Dorothy: The idea has worked well before, let us hope it can work out here!Meredith: I can understand completely. Please let me know if there is anything that I can do to help!Marcus: I have to first correct you and say that you can not defeat solid fingerprinting through trivial editing. This depends on the quality of the software, but many apps are not fooled by cropping, rotation, resizing, etc. Regarding your "pain point" idea, I have agree that is a good point but I am not really sure how well that works with the PB system. YouTube has managed to create one by limiting the uploads on non director accounts, but even director accounts are still free, it is just a matter of surrendering more personal information.This is something PB is going to have to work on in addition to these issues. However, if there is one thing that this whole ordeal has taught me it is that, while some people do suck, most people don't. I do have faith that the good guys still outnumber the bad.DeathNoteGurl: Thank you for stopping by! Please let me know if I can help in any way!Kara: I agree completely. Hopefully with this much momentum behind us, we can push PB to rethink their policies.Danni: Lol. Things picked up pretty quick shortly after this post went up. So many artists have really taken this issue to heart and have started to get the word out. I am completely floored by this response. I'm going to update the article, but it is already at 550. Everyone: Thank you so much for your support and your help! I greatly appreciate all that you have done on this matter. I can not express how overwhelming this response has been.

  10. Stephen Cullen says:

    Change it. For the love of god.

  11. eldris says:

    I totally agree with what’s been said here. Whenever I here people saying their work has been linked, the culprit is often using a photobucket account. I don’t use photobucket (anymore), so I don’t know the ins and outs of the site, but having read this I’m appalled. I cannot believe that legally they can allow people to produce prints of other peoples work, and that you have to opt OUT of this. Such things should always be opt in to protect their customers’ rights. Obviously they care a great deal more about profits than they do about their customers.

  12. Meredith Dillman says:

    Thank you. Too much of my life is spent tracking down image thefts when I should be painting instead.

  13. Please. PLEASE change it.

  14. eldris says:

    I totally agree with what’s been said here. Whenever I here people saying their work has been linked, the culprit is often using a photobucket account. I don’t use photobucket (anymore), so I don’t know the ins and outs of the site, but having read this I’m appalled. I cannot believe that legally they can allow people to produce prints of other peoples work, and that you have to opt OUT of this. Such things should always be opt in to protect their customers’ rights. Obviously they care a great deal more about profits than they do about their customers.

  15. loveit says:

    my art was stolen also from my site,and of course where was it at PHOTOBUCKET!! i think be beable to sue this company from NOT!!! doing there job!!!

  16. Kara Lach says:

    Hopefully they will hear our voices and do something about this. Its just not right people making money from other peoples hard work…specially when that person makes a living from their art.

  17. It seems there’s a fair lot more than 50 signatures on that petition ;) Try 510 after I’d done it.

  18. It seems there’s a fair lot more than 50 signatures on that petition ;) Try 510 after I’d done it.

  19. Kara Lach says:

    Jonathan:
    Yup a lot of the big artists on DevART have put the word out and they have a lot of watchers who in turn will put news out too. Hopefully we’ll get the numbers up into the 1000′s soon.

  20. Aimee says:

    Thank you for posting this.It is rather timely, since I have recently been dealing with the whole issue of Photobucket. There is another facet of this whole thing that really bleeds out into completely uncontrollable areas of the internet where Photobucket is concerned: Layout sites.I have found out that there are many places where people create Myspace skins, other layouts, blinkies, glitter graphics, etc. etc. – and guess where their number one source of material comes from? Yes, Photobucket. Through accident, ignorance, or plain ole' disregard, people have literally said to me that they considered Photobucket a "FREE RESOURCE SITE"…. or stock site, convenient for layout creators to utilize.So not only are the works available for download and printing, but they are also there for people to take and manipulate and make available for others to use. To play devil's advocate to my own argument, any one of these people could come to my website or DeviantArt site and steal the image from there. But I control my website. I willingly put it up there and do what I can do avoid art theft. But Photobucket (and similar websites) takes that control right out of my hands.The thing is, I don't mind if someone wants to feature one of my pictures on their blog. I've had many fans do that. They post the picture, give me a little free press, leave a link to my website – that's fantastic! That is how this whole art appreciation thing is supposed to work. Unfortunately, the way Photobucket works, it adds these other copyright infringing aspects to an account which otherwise might not have originally been created with 'stealing' in mind.It really is an ugly festering problem.

  21. Aimee says:

    Thank you for posting this.

    It is rather timely, since I have recently been dealing with the whole issue of Photobucket. There is another facet of this whole thing that really bleeds out into completely uncontrollable areas of the internet where Photobucket is concerned: Layout sites.

    I have found out that there are many places where people create Myspace skins, other layouts, blinkies, glitter graphics, etc. etc. – and guess where their number one source of material comes from? Yes, Photobucket. Through accident, ignorance, or plain ole' disregard, people have literally said to me that they considered Photobucket a "FREE RESOURCE SITE"…. or stock site, convenient for layout creators to utilize.

    So not only are the works available for download and printing, but they are also there for people to take and manipulate and make available for others to use.

    To play devil's advocate to my own argument, any one of these people could come to my website or DeviantArt site and steal the image from there. But I control my website. I willingly put it up there and do what I can do avoid art theft. But Photobucket (and similar websites) takes that control right out of my hands.

    The thing is, I don't mind if someone wants to feature one of my pictures on their blog. I've had many fans do that. They post the picture, give me a little free press, leave a link to my website – that's fantastic! That is how this whole art appreciation thing is supposed to work. Unfortunately, the way Photobucket works, it adds these other copyright infringing aspects to an account which otherwise might not have originally been created with 'stealing' in mind.

    It really is an ugly festering problem.

  22. Aimee says:

    Thank you for posting this.It is rather timely, since I have recently been dealing with the whole issue of Photobucket. There is another facet of this whole thing that really bleeds out into completely uncontrollable areas of the internet where Photobucket is concerned: Layout sites.I have found out that there are many places where people create Myspace skins, other layouts, blinkies, glitter graphics, etc. etc. – and guess where their number one source of material comes from? Yes, Photobucket. Through accident, ignorance, or plain ole' disregard, people have literally said to me that they considered Photobucket a "FREE RESOURCE SITE"…. or stock site, convenient for layout creators to utilize.So not only are the works available for download and printing, but they are also there for people to take and manipulate and make available for others to use. To play devil's advocate to my own argument, any one of these people could come to my website or DeviantArt site and steal the image from there. But I control my website. I willingly put it up there and do what I can do avoid art theft. But Photobucket (and similar websites) takes that control right out of my hands.The thing is, I don't mind if someone wants to feature one of my pictures on their blog. I've had many fans do that. They post the picture, give me a little free press, leave a link to my website – that's fantastic! That is how this whole art appreciation thing is supposed to work. Unfortunately, the way Photobucket works, it adds these other copyright infringing aspects to an account which otherwise might not have originally been created with 'stealing' in mind.It really is an ugly festering problem.

  23. Kara: That seems inevitable now. I plan to send the petition to PB formally first when it hits a thousand and update at intervals of 500. Hopefully, with this big of a push, we can institute some real change in this area.Antonia: Thank you very much for stopping by!Aimee: The layout problem with PB is a growing one and it is heightened by the fact that PB is designed from the ground up to be a sharing site. That isn't bad in and of itself, but most sharing sites let you embed your own images and place at least some restrictions on embedding other people's images. Most people think that, if there is a link to embed it, then it is ok. In some cases that is actually true. If you encourage people to embed your images, you'd be a fool to complain about it later. But the problem is that so much of PBs images are infringing in and of themselves that the embedding is just another infringement.Strangely, though I don't agree with all of their policies, I think Yahoo! Flickr has a good handle on this situation. You can only embed your own photos (correct me if I'm wrong here) and those image shave to reciprocate back to Flickr. They also prohibit the use of Flickr images in a layout.It is much better than PB in this area. Thank you very much for your feedback!

  24. Kara: That seems inevitable now. I plan to send the petition to PB formally first when it hits a thousand and update at intervals of 500. Hopefully, with this big of a push, we can institute some real change in this area.

    Antonia: Thank you very much for stopping by!

    Aimee: The layout problem with PB is a growing one and it is heightened by the fact that PB is designed from the ground up to be a sharing site. That isn't bad in and of itself, but most sharing sites let you embed your own images and place at least some restrictions on embedding other people's images. Most people think that, if there is a link to embed it, then it is ok.

    In some cases that is actually true. If you encourage people to embed your images, you'd be a fool to complain about it later. But the problem is that so much of PBs images are infringing in and of themselves that the embedding is just another infringement.

    Strangely, though I don't agree with all of their policies, I think Yahoo! Flickr has a good handle on this situation. You can only embed your own photos (correct me if I'm wrong here) and those image shave to reciprocate back to Flickr. They also prohibit the use of Flickr images in a layout.

    It is much better than PB in this area.

    Thank you very much for your feedback!

  25. Kara: That seems inevitable now. I plan to send the petition to PB formally first when it hits a thousand and update at intervals of 500. Hopefully, with this big of a push, we can institute some real change in this area.Antonia: Thank you very much for stopping by!Aimee: The layout problem with PB is a growing one and it is heightened by the fact that PB is designed from the ground up to be a sharing site. That isn't bad in and of itself, but most sharing sites let you embed your own images and place at least some restrictions on embedding other people's images. Most people think that, if there is a link to embed it, then it is ok. In some cases that is actually true. If you encourage people to embed your images, you'd be a fool to complain about it later. But the problem is that so much of PBs images are infringing in and of themselves that the embedding is just another infringement.Strangely, though I don't agree with all of their policies, I think Yahoo! Flickr has a good handle on this situation. You can only embed your own photos (correct me if I'm wrong here) and those image shave to reciprocate back to Flickr. They also prohibit the use of Flickr images in a layout.It is much better than PB in this area. Thank you very much for your feedback!

  26. Sandi Baker says:

    Jonathan – Thank you! I think that you are a real hero, and I want to express my appreciation for all that you have done here to help all of us. Please let us know what we can do to help you in return.

    And to the members of DeviantArt – You guys are showing the art world how to stand up for your rights! Thank you all for joining in the fight – you are all just amazing!

  27. Sandi Baker says:

    Jonathan – Thank you! I think that you are a real hero, and I want to express my appreciation for all that you have done here to help all of us. Please let us know what we can do to help you in return.And to the members of DeviantArt – You guys are showing the art world how to stand up for your rights! Thank you all for joining in the fight – you are all just amazing!

  28. Antonia says:

    Thank you D: PLEASE change it!

  29. J W Baker says:

    Jonathan,

    I think perhaps more Artists will participate in this effort if we can explain more fully how this effects them, which is difficult to do in an easy way because it has so many far reaching aspects…

    The image sharing thing is pretty rampant but places like PB (PhotoBucket) facilitate it – the mechanism is like a virus; one person uploads your image, the next person comes along and sees your image in this album and adds it to their own, and on it goes ad infinitum – prior to PB (and the like) each person at least had to find your site and take it directly from there, but now PB enables them. Then there is the code that PB provides that allows these 'public' images to be embedded anywhere – I understand that the ideal intent was probably meant to allow the INDIVIDUAL album owner to embed their OWN images on a Blog or personal web site, but as it is with all things, when excess becomes the norm – abuse of privilege sets in… 

     The sales aspect is probably not that bad (yet) but it has the potential to be – our reputations as Artist's are based on the integrity of our finished product. Under ideal circumstances, we the creators of our works should be the ones who oversee the quality of any reproductions – that is after all the idea behind licensing. The problem here is multi-faceted; given the inherent size of the images 'taken' no product of any real quality could be created, but with say an average size of 4.5 x 6-inches @ 72 dpi, a fairly reasonable one to one reproduction can be rendered and as you reduce the product size (stamps & buttons for example) the quality improves – Sandi ordered stamps which in size are 1.5 x 2" and being an Artist I can honestly say the quality is quite good! Thirty stamps for $4 – shipped and everything it's less than $8 – we can't compete with that, so potentially you end up competing against yourself – that's insult to injury. There are images on there however of some of the more well known Artists whose works have been uploaded at large enough dimension AND resolution to render more than exceptional results at much larger sizes…

    In our case, if we had licensed those very same images to a company who makes stamps, well those unlicensed reproductions cause a potential problem – this 'conflict' could cast aspersions on our integrity, or that of any other Artist who also licenses their works. There is also the very basic principle of what copyright means – our inherent right to defend and preserve the artistic integrity of our individual artistic statements. When people post these works on web sites and blogs without attribution or a link/reference to the original author so that the viewer may see the work as it was meant to be viewed in it's original context, this undermines our artistic integrity which is our livelihood, because as we all know too well – in the world of art; "perception is everything." – and, how could people know to render that attribution if they acquire the work through an offhand way that never brought them in direct contact with its original author? It is very easy to be cavalier with concern to using images in this unauthorized fashion when the original author is nothing more than a faceless entity…

    Being a "faceless entity" I believe is a part of the problem – we need to put a face on these Artists (all of us) – there was a Public Service announcement sometime back that was aimed at dissuading the pirating of DVD's – it showed the grips, the gaffers, carpenters, etc. who also work on those blockbuster movies and had them saying; "please don't pirate these movies because it effects our livelihood too" – it's very easy for the average person to justify pinching a copy of a DVD from someone they believe to have 'deep pockets' or endless resources – they don't think it would hurt MGM (or whomever) because to their way of thinking; "They've got billions, they won't miss this", but no one stops to consider the others involved… Not all of us have obtained the success to be thought of as; "millionaire Artists" – most of us are just regular people just trying to do what we do best. If we could create a similar public service announcement and circulate it on YouTube, well that would be something – no reason we can't make the same Internet that detracts from us now, also work for us as well - I think it is a matter of will and setting obtainable goals… 

    We have no delusions regarding an outcome – this cannot be magically resolved by a simple petition – this problem will always exist on some level, just like there will unfortunately never be an end to murder, rape, theft and all the other unfortunate aspects of human nature, but just because it cannot be ended doesn't mean we should not proceed anyway, for it can at least be diminished and THAT is something that didn't exist before the effort was begun…

    The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step – this is our step. Art on the Internet is a new frontier – the problems are being identified, that's the easy part – forging the solutions and the guidelines for what is to come is the next step in that 'journey'.

    This isn't just about the visual arts either, it's about all forms of artistic expression and you never know who might get on board – the Internet is a very big place so let's keep working towards our goal.

    Thank you for your efforts on behalf of us all!

  30. J W Baker says:

    Jonathan,I think perhaps more Artists will participate in this effort if we can explain more fully how this effects them, which is difficult to do in an easy way because it has so many far reaching aspects… The image sharing thing is pretty rampant but places like PB (PhotoBucket) facilitate it – the mechanism is like a virus; one person uploads your image, the next person comes along and sees your image in this album and adds it to their own, and on it goes ad infinitum – prior to PB (and the like) each person at least had to find your site and take it directly from there, but now PB enables them. Then there is the code that PB provides that allows these 'public' images to be embedded anywhere – I understand that the ideal intent was probably meant to allow the INDIVIDUAL album owner to embed their OWN images on a Blog or personal web site, but as it is with all things, when excess becomes the norm – abuse of privilege sets in… 

     The sales aspect is probably not that bad (yet) but it has the potential to be – our reputations as Artist's are based on the integrity of our finished product. Under ideal circumstances, we the creators of our works should be the ones who oversee the quality of any reproductions – that is after all the idea behind licensing. The problem here is multi-faceted; given the inherent size of the images 'taken' no product of any real quality could be created, but with say an average size of 4.5 x 6-inches @ 72 dpi, a fairly reasonable one to one reproduction can be rendered and as you reduce the product size (stamps & buttons for example) the quality improves – Sandi ordered stamps which in size are 1.5 x 2" and being an Artist I can honestly say the quality is quite good! Thirty stamps for $4 – shipped and everything it's less than $8 – we can't compete with that, so potentially you end up competing against yourself – that's insult to injury. There are images on there however of some of the more well known Artists whose works have been uploaded at large enough dimension AND resolution to render more than exceptional results at much larger sizes…In our case, if we had licensed those very same images to a company who makes stamps, well those unlicensed reproductions cause a potential problem – this 'conflict' could cast aspersions on our integrity, or that of any other Artist who also licenses their works. There is also the very basic principle of what copyright means – our inherent right to defend and preserve the artistic integrity of our individual artistic statements. When people post these works on web sites and blogs without attribution or a link/reference to the original author so that the viewer may see the work as it was meant to be viewed in it's original context, this undermines our artistic integrity which is our livelihood, because as we all know too well – in the world of art; "perception is everything." – and, how could people know to render that attribution if they acquire the work through an offhand way that never brought them in direct contact with its original author? It is very easy to be cavalier with concern to using images in this unauthorized fashion when the original author is nothing more than a faceless entity…Being a "faceless entity" I believe is a part of the problem – we need to put a face on these Artists (all of us) – there was a Public Service announcement sometime back that was aimed at dissuading the pirating of DVD's – it showed the grips, the gaffers, carpenters, etc. who also work on those blockbuster movies and had them saying; "please don't pirate these movies because it effects our livelihood too" – it's very easy for the average person to justify pinching a copy of a DVD from someone they believe to have 'deep pockets' or endless resources – they don't think it would hurt MGM (or whomever) because to their way of thinking; "They've got billions, they won't miss this", but no one stops to consider the others involved… Not all of us have obtained the success to be thought of as; "millionaire Artists" – most of us are just regular people just trying to do what we do best. If we could create a similar public service announcement and circulate it on YouTube, well that would be something – no reason we can't make the same Internet that detracts from us now, also work for us as well - I think it is a matter of will and setting obtainable goals… We have no delusions regarding an outcome – this cannot be magically resolved by a simple petition – this problem will always exist on some level, just like there will unfortunately never be an end to murder, rape, theft and all the other unfortunate aspects of human nature, but just because it cannot be ended doesn't mean we should not proceed anyway, for it can at least be diminished and THAT is something that didn't exist before the effort was begun…The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step – this is our step. Art on the Internet is a new frontier – the problems are being identified, that's the easy part – forging the solutions and the guidelines for what is to come is the next step in that 'journey'. This isn't just about the visual arts either, it's about all forms of artistic expression and you never know who might get on board – the Internet is a very big place so let's keep working towards our goal.Thank you for your efforts on behalf of us all!

  31. Sandi: None of this would have been possible without you so thank YOU for all that you have done in this area. You have no idea how much it means.JW: I really don't have anything that I can add to what you said other than to encourage others to read it. I agree that there is a need to "humanize" this problem more and that is something we should look at in future rounds. I think that is an idea we can definitely work with!Bob: Sadly, I don't even have a FaceBook account. If anyone wants to create a group for that purpose, I will gladly link to it here.Diana: This is just a first step, there are other acts to follow. We're playing nice and trying to work together right now, if PB doesn't want that, then we will look at all other options. However, I'm putting my faith that PB is a good site run by good people and that they will want to do the right thing.

  32. Renee says:

    I've had artwork stolen and others claiming it's there's. This happened in a class I was in three years ago. I had my artwork on my website (no watermark on them yet) and the next day I saw one of my classmates sporting it as their own. The idiot printed it out and signed it. So I brought my sketchbook with the ORIGINAL drawing and my signature, showed the teacher my gallery, and watched my classmate get kicked out of the class. Since then I've had to put ugly watermarks on my drawings on the website.It's annoying. I wish there was something I could do to keep unimaginative, unoriginal art thieves from stealing my work but the only way to do that at this point is to not post it at all. I don't want to do that.

  33. Sandi: None of this would have been possible without you so thank YOU for all that you have done in this area. You have no idea how much it means.

    JW: I really don't have anything that I can add to what you said other than to encourage others to read it. I agree that there is a need to "humanize" this problem more and that is something we should look at in future rounds. I think that is an idea we can definitely work with!

    Bob: Sadly, I don't even have a FaceBook account. If anyone wants to create a group for that purpose, I will gladly link to it here.

    Diana: This is just a first step, there are other acts to follow. We're playing nice and trying to work together right now, if PB doesn't want that, then we will look at all other options. However, I'm putting my faith that PB is a good site run by good people and that they will want to do the right thing.

  34. Sandi: None of this would have been possible without you so thank YOU for all that you have done in this area. You have no idea how much it means.JW: I really don't have anything that I can add to what you said other than to encourage others to read it. I agree that there is a need to "humanize" this problem more and that is something we should look at in future rounds. I think that is an idea we can definitely work with!Bob: Sadly, I don't even have a FaceBook account. If anyone wants to create a group for that purpose, I will gladly link to it here.Diana: This is just a first step, there are other acts to follow. We're playing nice and trying to work together right now, if PB doesn't want that, then we will look at all other options. However, I'm putting my faith that PB is a good site run by good people and that they will want to do the right thing.

  35. Renee says:

    I've had artwork stolen and others claiming it's there's. This happened in a class I was in three years ago. I had my artwork on my website (no watermark on them yet) and the next day I saw one of my classmates sporting it as their own. The idiot printed it out and signed it. So I brought my sketchbook with the ORIGINAL drawing and my signature, showed the teacher my gallery, and watched my classmate get kicked out of the class. Since then I've had to put ugly watermarks on my drawings on the website.

    It's annoying. I wish there was something I could do to keep unimaginative, unoriginal art thieves from stealing my work but the only way to do that at this point is to not post it at all. I don't want to do that.

  36. Renee says:

    I've had artwork stolen and others claiming it's there's. This happened in a class I was in three years ago. I had my artwork on my website (no watermark on them yet) and the next day I saw one of my classmates sporting it as their own. The idiot printed it out and signed it. So I brought my sketchbook with the ORIGINAL drawing and my signature, showed the teacher my gallery, and watched my classmate get kicked out of the class. Since then I've had to put ugly watermarks on my drawings on the website.It's annoying. I wish there was something I could do to keep unimaginative, unoriginal art thieves from stealing my work but the only way to do that at this point is to not post it at all. I don't want to do that.

  37. [...] subscribing to my RSS feed. Thank you for visiting!I wanted to provide a very brief update on the article regarding PhotoBucket that went online [...]

  38. Elizabeth says:

    I haven't found any of my art stolen. Yet. At this stage I'm only getting better, so I need to watch out.And, when I signed the petition, I was number 1168.

  39. J W Baker says:

    Jonathan,

    I think perhaps more Artists will participate in this effort if we can explain more fully how this effects them, which is difficult to do in an easy way because it has so many far reaching aspects…

    The image sharing thing is pretty rampant but places like PB (PhotoBucket) facilitate it – the mechanism is like a virus; one person uploads your image, the next person comes along and sees your image in this album and adds it to their own, and on it goes ad infinitum – prior to PB (and the like) each person at least had to find your site and take it directly from there, but now PB enables them. Then there is the code that PB provides that allows these ‘public’ images to be embedded anywhere – I understand that the ideal intent was probably meant to allow the INDIVIDUAL album owner to embed their OWN images on a Blog or personal web site, but as it is with all things, when excess becomes the norm – abuse of privilege sets in… 
     The sales aspect is probably not that bad (yet) but it has the potential to be – our reputations as Artist’s are based on the integrity of our finished product. Under ideal circumstances, we the creators of our works should be the ones who oversee the quality of any reproductions – that is after all the idea behind licensing. The problem here is multi-faceted; given the inherent size of the images ‘taken’ no product of any real quality could be created, but with say an average size of 4.5 x 6-inches @ 72 dpi, a fairly reasonable one to one reproduction can be rendered and as you reduce the product size (stamps & buttons for example) the quality improves – Sandi ordered stamps which in size are 1.5 x 2″ and being an Artist I can honestly say the quality is quite good! Thirty stamps for $4 – shipped and everything it’s less than $8 – we can’t compete with that, so potentially you end up competing against yourself – that’s insult to injury. There are images on there however of some of the more well known Artists whose works have been uploaded at large enough dimension AND resolution to render more than exceptional results at much larger sizes…

    In our case, if we had licensed those very same images to a company who makes stamps, well those unlicensed reproductions cause a potential problem – this ‘conflict’ could cast aspersions on our integrity, or that of any other Artist who also licenses their works. There is also the very basic principle of what copyright means – our inherent right to defend and preserve the artistic integrity of our individual artistic statements. When people post these works on web sites and blogs without attribution or a link/reference to the original author so that the viewer may see the work as it was meant to be viewed in it’s original context, this undermines our artistic integrity which is our livelihood, because as we all know too well – in the world of art; “perception is everything.” – and, how could people know to render that attribution if they acquire the work through an offhand way that never brought them in direct contact with its original author? It is very easy to be cavalier with concern to using images in this unauthorized fashion when the original author is nothing more than a faceless entity…

    Being a “faceless entity” I believe is a part of the problem – we need to put a face on these Artists (all of us) – there was a Public Service announcement sometime back that was aimed at dissuading the pirating of DVD’s – it showed the grips, the gaffers, carpenters, etc. who also work on those blockbuster movies and had them saying; “please don’t pirate these movies because it effects our livelihood too” – it’s very easy for the average person to justify pinching a copy of a DVD from someone they believe to have ‘deep pockets’ or endless resources – they don’t think it would hurt MGM (or whomever) because to their way of thinking; “They’ve got billions, they won’t miss this”, but no one stops to consider the others involved… Not all of us have obtained the success to be thought of as; “millionaire Artists” – most of us are just regular people just trying to do what we do best. If we could create a similar public service announcement and circulate it on YouTube, well that would be something – no reason we can’t make the same Internet that detracts from us now, also work for us as well - I think it is a matter of will and setting obtainable goals… 

    We have no delusions regarding an outcome – this cannot be magically resolved by a simple petition – this problem will always exist on some level, just like there will unfortunately never be an end to murder, rape, theft and all the other unfortunate aspects of human nature, but just because it cannot be ended doesn’t mean we should not proceed anyway, for it can at least be diminished and THAT is something that didn’t exist before the effort was begun…

    The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step – this is our step. Art on the Internet is a new frontier – the problems are being identified, that’s the easy part – forging the solutions and the guidelines for what is to come is the next step in that ‘journey’.

    This isn’t just about the visual arts either, it’s about all forms of artistic expression and you never know who might get on board – the Internet is a very big place so let’s keep working towards our goal.

    Thank you for your efforts on behalf of us all!

  40. Mary-T: I can understand your fear. However, there are ways to protect your content. I definitely encourage you to use watermarking and other tools to help reduce the amount of theft and ensure that your works always point back to you. It may seem a pain, but if done right it can work out very well.

    Rynnay: Thank you very much for your encouragement and for stopping by! If there is anything I can do to help with a specific case, please let me know!

  41. Mary-T: I can understand your fear. However, there are ways to protect your content. I definitely encourage you to use watermarking and other tools to help reduce the amount of theft and ensure that your works always point back to you. It may seem a pain, but if done right it can work out very well.Rynnay: Thank you very much for your encouragement and for stopping by! If there is anything I can do to help with a specific case, please let me know!

  42. Bob says:

    If you create a facebook group, you can gain a lot more exposure.

  43. Elizabeth says:

    I haven't found any of my art stolen. Yet. At this stage I'm only getting better, so I need to watch out.

    And, when I signed the petition, I was number 1168.

  44. Elizabeth says:

    I haven't found any of my art stolen. Yet. At this stage I'm only getting better, so I need to watch out.And, when I signed the petition, I was number 1168.

  45. Diana Galvin says:

    The system seriously does need to be changed. I was suspicious when I first saw “by prints” on photobucket, and I’m glad some people looked into it enough that it could possibly be changed. I just hope we can actually get through to them through an online petition. It seems like a lot of people know about this problem and the fact that it is a problem. That is definitely a step in the right direction!

  46. Diana Galvin says:

    The system seriously does need to be changed. I was suspicious when I first saw “by prints” on photobucket, and I’m glad some people looked into it enough that it could possibly be changed. I just hope we can actually get through to them through an online petition. It seems like a lot of people know about this problem and the fact that it is a problem. That is definitely a step in the right direction!

  47. Mary-T says:

    I fear the day that I get many viewers on my website because I know I will eventually be stolen from like so many other artists who have worked for years to develop their styles. Photobucket must join the march against theft if they expect to continue hosting pictures in peace.

  48. Rynnay says:

    Thanks for posting this article. I was directed here after finding my work reposted on Photobucket (AGAIN). I’m hoping and praying the petition will encourage Photobucket to modify their service.

  49. Jeipi says:

    Although I doubt that anyone would steal my art, I still feel that it shouldn’t be right for people to get away with art theft and plagiarism. I honestly hope that this gets passed.

  50. Val says:

    I agree. Though I may not be a well known artist, I fear for those who are.

    I know how much time and effort goes into a print and, frankly, this entire thing with Photobucket is ridiculous.

  51. Val says:

    I agree. Though I may not be a well known artist, I fear for those who are. I know how much time and effort goes into a print and, frankly, this entire thing with Photobucket is ridiculous.

  52. Rynnay says:

    Thanks for posting this article. I was directed here after finding my work reposted on Photobucket (AGAIN). I’m hoping and praying the petition will encourage Photobucket to modify their service.

  53. Jeipi says:

    Although I doubt that anyone would steal my art, I still feel that it shouldn’t be right for people to get away with art theft and plagiarism. I honestly hope that this gets passed.

  54. Rae says:

    Oh please get them to change it. I’ve had several pieces of my art stolen from me before (and while they’re only sketches people can still sell them for money) and have worried constantly about whether or not my better pieces would get stolen and sold without my consent (especially since some of those pieces were commisioned).

  55. Rae says:

    Oh please get them to change it. I’ve had several pieces of my art stolen from me before (and while they’re only sketches people can still sell them for money) and have worried constantly about whether or not my better pieces would get stolen and sold without my consent (especially since some of those pieces were commisioned).

  56. AJ says:

    As a Concept Artist / Illustrator I find this very troubling. I think people fail to understand the number of hours artists put into creating artwork which is sad really. I think this problem of ripping artwork needs addressed a.s.a.p. this after all is the livelyhood of many of these artists and illustrators! Please address this problem…Art theft is a crime!

  57. Jeipi: Thank you very much for your comment. I think you're probably being far too hard on your work thought. There really is no pattern to which works get taken and which done, all that has to happen is that someone, the wrong person that is, likes it enough to do so. That can happen to quite literally anyone, whether you have one fan or millions.Elizabeth: Definitely keep an eye out. This is a very growing area of concern on the Web.Rae: We are doing our best, we sent the petition on to PB this morning so we will see what happens!Val: Thank you very much for your support. I agree that this is pretty ridiculous, but I am holding out hope that it is an innocent mistake and can be corrected peacefully.AJ: Thank you for your support as well. Hopefully we can get this matter addressed and then start to push on other fronts to make the Web a better place over all!

  58. Jeipi: Thank you very much for your comment. I think you're probably being far too hard on your work thought. There really is no pattern to which works get taken and which done, all that has to happen is that someone, the wrong person that is, likes it enough to do so. That can happen to quite literally anyone, whether you have one fan or millions.

    Elizabeth: Definitely keep an eye out. This is a very growing area of concern on the Web.

    Rae: We are doing our best, we sent the petition on to PB this morning so we will see what happens!

    Val: Thank you very much for your support. I agree that this is pretty ridiculous, but I am holding out hope that it is an innocent mistake and can be corrected peacefully.

    AJ: Thank you for your support as well. Hopefully we can get this matter addressed and then start to push on other fronts to make the Web a better place over all!

  59. Jeipi: Thank you very much for your comment. I think you're probably being far too hard on your work thought. There really is no pattern to which works get taken and which done, all that has to happen is that someone, the wrong person that is, likes it enough to do so. That can happen to quite literally anyone, whether you have one fan or millions.Elizabeth: Definitely keep an eye out. This is a very growing area of concern on the Web.Rae: We are doing our best, we sent the petition on to PB this morning so we will see what happens!Val: Thank you very much for your support. I agree that this is pretty ridiculous, but I am holding out hope that it is an innocent mistake and can be corrected peacefully.AJ: Thank you for your support as well. Hopefully we can get this matter addressed and then start to push on other fronts to make the Web a better place over all!

  60. Church: You are very welcome for the effort, however, try to take some heart as technology is starting to catch up to this issue. I expect some big changes within the next year!

    Mandie: Thank you for your support! We already have over 2300 signatories and the list keeps growing!

  61. Church: You are very welcome for the effort, however, try to take some heart as technology is starting to catch up to this issue. I expect some big changes within the next year!Mandie: Thank you for your support! We already have over 2300 signatories and the list keeps growing!

  62. Church says:

    I really appreciate what you have done here and what data your are covering. I have had a difficult time keeping my art work and writing “mine” as the original. Having a picturetrail site was a long decision and I am still looking at the risks. It was GREAT! to get notice about Photobucket before I went any further. Even with all the precautions I have run across quite a few people who look at high end gallery sites or other original artist’s sites and then they copy it but badly and sell it on some of the sites that are for “hobbyists” or “gift sites”. There is no way for an original artist to be able to keep up with who took what when and still get work done. So I am grateful for all your info and work.

  63. Mandie V. says:

    It’s about time someone made this petition, it bothered me for a while that photobucket even had that option. I hope many more people sign this

  64. Church says:

    I really appreciate what you have done here and what data your are covering. I have had a difficult time keeping my art work and writing “mine” as the original. Having a picturetrail site was a long decision and I am still looking at the risks. It was GREAT! to get notice about Photobucket before I went any further. Even with all the precautions I have run across quite a few people who look at high end gallery sites or other original artist’s sites and then they copy it but badly and sell it on some of the sites that are for “hobbyists” or “gift sites”. There is no way for an original artist to be able to keep up with who took what when and still get work done. So I am grateful for all your info and work.

  65. Mandie V. says:

    It’s about time someone made this petition, it bothered me for a while that photobucket even had that option. I hope many more people sign this

  66. Brett S says:

    plagarism is a serious crime and if i ever saw one of my works posted on deviantart.com not under my photobucket.com account i would be greatly pissed and probably would sue the person. I’m going to watermark all my stuff from now on. I am happy to sign this

  67. Brett S says:

    plagarism is a serious crime and if i ever saw one of my works posted on deviantart.com not under my photobucket.com account i would be greatly pissed and probably would sue the person. I’m going to watermark all my stuff from now on. I am happy to sign this

  68. Tikurrui says:

    OHMYGOSH SOMETHING MUST BE DONE!!! Although I'm not so much of an artist, and no one would really copy my artwork, I would be furious if someone stole it anyway.I SIGN THIS.

  69. Tikurrui says:

    OHMYGOSH SOMETHING MUST BE DONE!!! Although I’m not so much of an artist, and no one would really copy my artwork, I would be furious if someone stole it anyway.

    I SIGN THIS.

  70. ___ r e i says:

    I agreed with what you have wrote above. So many people always stole other people's art, and WITHOUT asking their permission yet. I must say, every artists know that their arts must not be published without the owner's permission. Sadly, PhotoBucket also provides prints. The artist's efforts will became nothing if the prints doesn't give them any result. I will sign this. If I have time, I'll ask people to spread this petition and also asks them to sign this petition.

  71. ___ r e i says:

    I agreed with what you have wrote above. So many people always stole other people’s art, and WITHOUT asking their permission yet. I must say, every artists know that their arts must not be published without the owner’s permission. Sadly, PhotoBucket also provides prints. The artist’s efforts will became nothing if the prints doesn’t give them any result.

    I will sign this. If I have time, I’ll ask people to spread this petition and also asks them to sign this petition.

  72. ZaZa says:

    I was getting some design ideas for needlepoint canvases for a yarn shop, so I looked on PB for images. I found enough for a series and forwarded them to the shop owner, WITH THE PROVISO that they had to reshoot the sites themselves and send me their images to create the canvases. Also, these were pics of privately owned buildings of historic interest, so I told them I also wanted releases from the owners.

    I have no idea if the releases are necessary, seems I recall something about anything photographed out of doors was fair game. But I felt that the good will of the buildings' owners should be important to a local shop owner who planned to sell the canvases.

    This is all not to impress you with what a good girl I am but to lead up to how appalled I was to see how easily any image on PB could be stolen. I and a friend who lives a thousand miles from me share a PB account so we can share pics. We've kept it private, even though I can't imagine anyone wanting to steal the silly stuff we share. But, these days, you just never know. /;+)

    Good luck on getting this initiative acted upon.

  73. ZaZa says:

    I was getting some design ideas for needlepoint canvases for a yarn shop, so I looked on PB for images. I found enough for a series and forwarded them to the shop owner, WITH THE PROVISO that they had to reshoot the sites themselves and send me their images to create the canvases. Also, these were pics of privately owned buildings of historic interest, so I told them I also wanted releases from the owners.I have no idea if the releases are necessary, seems I recall something about anything photographed out of doors was fair game. But I felt that the good will of the buildings' owners should be important to a local shop owner who planned to sell the canvases.This is all not to impress you with what a good girl I am but to lead up to how appalled I was to see how easily any image on PB could be stolen. I and a friend who lives a thousand miles from me share a PB account so we can share pics. We've kept it private, even though I can't imagine anyone wanting to steal the silly stuff we share. But, these days, you just never know. /; )Good luck on getting this initiative acted upon.

  74. ZaZa says:

    I was getting some design ideas for needlepoint canvases for a yarn shop, so I looked on PB for images. I found enough for a series and forwarded them to the shop owner, WITH THE PROVISO that they had to reshoot the sites themselves and send me their images to create the canvases. Also, these were pics of privately owned buildings of historic interest, so I told them I also wanted releases from the owners.

    I have no idea if the releases are necessary, seems I recall something about anything photographed out of doors was fair game. But I felt that the good will of the buildings’ owners should be important to a local shop owner who planned to sell the canvases.

    This is all not to impress you with what a good girl I am but to lead up to how appalled I was to see how easily any image on PB could be stolen. I and a friend who lives a thousand miles from me share a PB account so we can share pics. We’ve kept it private, even though I can’t imagine anyone wanting to steal the silly stuff we share. But, these days, you just never know. /;+)

    Good luck on getting this initiative acted upon.

  75. Brett: Thank you for signing the petition!Tikurrui: Thank you for your support. I think you might be surprised though. Many people underestimate both themselves as artists and the desire for others to copy. I would be careful.Rei: Thank you for your support and I would greatly appreciate any help you can provide in spreading the word!Zaza: First off, thank you for your work in general in this area. To speak about the issue with the buildings, there is a lot of debate in that area. If a building is historical, it is probably in the public domain no matter what, but newer buildings have been the subject of much debate. Some believe they can be copyright protected, others don't.I know that, from a privacy standpoint, anything you shoot from a public street or sidewalk is fair, but that does not necessary mean it is clear from a copyright one.On that note, definitely keep the account private. The truth of the matter is that you never know. Besides, it's probably best for your purpose as you likely don't want to the world knowing everything you share.Thank you again for everything!

  76. Brett: Thank you for signing the petition!

    Tikurrui: Thank you for your support. I think you might be surprised though. Many people underestimate both themselves as artists and the desire for others to copy. I would be careful.

    Rei: Thank you for your support and I would greatly appreciate any help you can provide in spreading the word!

    Zaza: First off, thank you for your work in general in this area. To speak about the issue with the buildings, there is a lot of debate in that area. If a building is historical, it is probably in the public domain no matter what, but newer buildings have been the subject of much debate. Some believe they can be copyright protected, others don't.

    I know that, from a privacy standpoint, anything you shoot from a public street or sidewalk is fair, but that does not necessary mean it is clear from a copyright one.

    On that note, definitely keep the account private. The truth of the matter is that you never know. Besides, it's probably best for your purpose as you likely don't want to the world knowing everything you share.

    Thank you again for everything!

  77. Brett: Thank you for signing the petition!Tikurrui: Thank you for your support. I think you might be surprised though. Many people underestimate both themselves as artists and the desire for others to copy. I would be careful.Rei: Thank you for your support and I would greatly appreciate any help you can provide in spreading the word!Zaza: First off, thank you for your work in general in this area. To speak about the issue with the buildings, there is a lot of debate in that area. If a building is historical, it is probably in the public domain no matter what, but newer buildings have been the subject of much debate. Some believe they can be copyright protected, others don't.I know that, from a privacy standpoint, anything you shoot from a public street or sidewalk is fair, but that does not necessary mean it is clear from a copyright one.On that note, definitely keep the account private. The truth of the matter is that you never know. Besides, it's probably best for your purpose as you likely don't want to the world knowing everything you share.Thank you again for everything!

  78. Livion says:

    You guys should check out http://www.alexiuss.deviantart.com and view his journal. People on photobucket are taking his work all the time and selling it without his permission and he does plan to sue if one more of his images are sold without his explicit permission.

  79. Livion says:

    You guys should check out http://www.alexiuss.deviantart.com and view his journal. People on photobucket are taking his work all the time and selling it without his permission and he does plan to sue if one more of his images are sold without his explicit permission.

  80. Livion says:

    You guys should check out http://www.alexiuss.deviantart.com and view his journal. People on photobucket are taking his work all the time and selling it without his permission and he does plan to sue if one more of his images are sold without his explicit permission.

  81. ZaZa says:

    Jonathon, I wasn't really concerned about the legalities of photographing the buildings. But these are all business people, the shop owners and the people who use the historic sites because of their historical cachet. To go and make money from images of someone else's business premises, without permission, may not be illegal, but it's definitely tacky. /; ))) They all have to operate in the same small business community, so not a good way to behave. I don't think blog thieves are too worried about tacky, though.

  82. Livion: Thank you very much for the suggestion!

  83. ZaZa says:

    Jonathon, I wasn’t really concerned about the legalities of photographing the buildings. But these are all business people, the shop owners and the people who use the historic sites because of their historical cachet. To go and make money from images of someone else’s business premises, without permission, may not be illegal, but it’s definitely tacky. /;+))) They all have to operate in the same small business community, so not a good way to behave. I don’t think blog thieves are too worried about tacky, though.

  84. Kara Lach says:

    Speaking of this legalities on buildings. One of my photographer friends was saying the other day that public photos may be banned because of peoples rights not to want their face on the internet…or in someone’s portfolio…etc…It’ll be interesting to see where this goes, specially with the tourist population, I know as a tourist and local I want to take photos of things that are interesting (buildings, people, scenes, things…etc) this law if made legal and enforced will put a few people off side.

  85. Kara Lach says:

    Speaking of this legalities on buildings. One of my photographer friends was saying the other day that public photos may be banned because of peoples rights not to want their face on the internet…or in someone’s portfolio…etc…It’ll be interesting to see where this goes, specially with the tourist population, I know as a tourist and local I want to take photos of things that are interesting (buildings, people, scenes, things…etc) this law if made legal and enforced will put a few people off side.

  86. Zaza: I see what you're saying. Is it tacky in some cases? Yes. I saw plenty of this when I was in Key West. Of course, a lot of businesses work very hard to make their establishment something that others would want to photograph and be photographed with, could be just the price of doing business in that way. Kara: I doubt such a law would ever fly. The reason is that when you are in public it is assumed that the acts you are doing are, well, public. First amendment rights would likely trump privacy rights here since there i no expectation of privacy in a public place.Still, it isn't the strangest argument I've heard. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.Daz: The one flaw is that, in this day and age, copies can be as good as originals and this doesn't help areas such as photography where all originals are really copies, unless you sell the negatives.Just something to ponder.

  87. Daz Cox says:

    Art is only worth in a money way what someone pays for it, maybe the answer is to encourage people to collect one of a kind art, originals have more magic than copies. give the copies away for free. there, problem solved.

  88. Zaza: I see what you're saying. Is it tacky in some cases? Yes. I saw plenty of this when I was in Key West. Of course, a lot of businesses work very hard to make their establishment something that others would want to photograph and be photographed with, could be just the price of doing business in that way.

    Kara: I doubt such a law would ever fly. The reason is that when you are in public it is assumed that the acts you are doing are, well, public. First amendment rights would likely trump privacy rights here since there i no expectation of privacy in a public place.

    Still, it isn't the strangest argument I've heard. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.

    Daz: The one flaw is that, in this day and age, copies can be as good as originals and this doesn't help areas such as photography where all originals are really copies, unless you sell the negatives.

    Just something to ponder.

  89. Zaza: I see what you're saying. Is it tacky in some cases? Yes. I saw plenty of this when I was in Key West. Of course, a lot of businesses work very hard to make their establishment something that others would want to photograph and be photographed with, could be just the price of doing business in that way. Kara: I doubt such a law would ever fly. The reason is that when you are in public it is assumed that the acts you are doing are, well, public. First amendment rights would likely trump privacy rights here since there i no expectation of privacy in a public place.Still, it isn't the strangest argument I've heard. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.Daz: The one flaw is that, in this day and age, copies can be as good as originals and this doesn't help areas such as photography where all originals are really copies, unless you sell the negatives.Just something to ponder.

  90. Kara Lach says:

    Jonathan: I could see it happening more so over here in Australia since as you say would conflict with the first amendment rights…4000 signatures WOW! Going strong. Did you get a reply from PB yet?

  91. Tracye Shearin says:

    I just read this article by way of deviantart.com. I typed my name in the search engine and sure enough, six of my images are up there to be used any which way that person wants it to be used. I do not sell my work ANYWAY so the thought of my images being stolen then made to seem as if someone else created them AND THEN sold is just unbelievable to me.

    Photobucket needs to revamp their company and fast. All images found on the web are not free. Someone created them. If you take that image and do not give credit you are a thief. If you then try to sell those images as if you have the right, you are a fraud and a thief.

    I am so glad you've written this article and help form that petition. Thank God someone is awake at the wheel! Although I'm sure you are one among many, even so, THANK YOU.

    I've signed the petition. I hope Photobucket takes note and makes some policy changes and fast.

  92. Tracye Shearin says:

    I just read this article by way of deviantart.com. I typed my name in the search engine and sure enough, six of my images are up there to be used any which way that person wants it to be used. I do not sell my work ANYWAY so the thought of my images being stolen then made to seem as if someone else created them AND THEN sold is just unbelievable to me.Photobucket needs to revamp their company and fast. All images found on the web are not free. Someone created them. If you take that image and do not give credit you are a thief. If you then try to sell those images as if you have the right, you are a fraud and a thief.I am so glad you've written this article and help form that petition. Thank God someone is awake at the wheel! Although I'm sure you are one among many, even so, THANK YOU.I've signed the petition. I hope Photobucket takes note and makes some policy changes and fast.

  93. Kara Lach says:

    Jonathan: I could see it happening more so over here in Australia since as you say would conflict with the first amendment rights…4000+ signatures WOW! Going strong. Did you get a reply from PB yet?

  94. Tracye Shearin says:

    I just read this article by way of deviantart.com. I typed my name in the search engine and sure enough, six of my images are up there to be used any which way that person wants it to be used. I do not sell my work ANYWAY so the thought of my images being stolen then made to seem as if someone else created them AND THEN sold is just unbelievable to me.

    Photobucket needs to revamp their company and fast. All images found on the web are not free. Someone created them. If you take that image and do not give credit you are a thief. If you then try to sell those images as if you have the right, you are a fraud and a thief.

    I am so glad you’ve written this article and help form that petition. Thank God someone is awake at the wheel! Although I’m sure you are one among many, even so, THANK YOU.

    I’ve signed the petition. I hope Photobucket takes note and makes some policy changes and fast.

  95. Kara: No reply from PB yet, but with the holiday weekend it isn't surprising. I am going to resend the petition tomorrow to all of their addresses.Tracye: Thank you very much for your support and I'm sorry to hear that you found so many of your images on PB. Please let me know if you need any help getting them taken down as I'll gladly do what I can!

  96. Kara: No reply from PB yet, but with the holiday weekend it isn't surprising. I am going to resend the petition tomorrow to all of their addresses.

    Tracye: Thank you very much for your support and I'm sorry to hear that you found so many of your images on PB. Please let me know if you need any help getting them taken down as I'll gladly do what I can!

  97. Kara: No reply from PB yet, but with the holiday weekend it isn't surprising. I am going to resend the petition tomorrow to all of their addresses.Tracye: Thank you very much for your support and I'm sorry to hear that you found so many of your images on PB. Please let me know if you need any help getting them taken down as I'll gladly do what I can!

  98. Izzy~* says:

    im sick of finding peoples art all over photo bucket.i really hope that photobucket changes 3:

  99. Jennifer says:

    I agree. Too many artists are having there art stolen and redistributed and the real artists name gets lost among all the comotion.

    Its ridiculous. Photobucket needs to change, really. I mean, having a print on demand feature in my opinion is horrible.

  100. Jennifer says:

    I agree. Too many artists are having there art stolen and redistributed and the real artists name gets lost among all the comotion. Its ridiculous. Photobucket needs to change, really. I mean, having a print on demand feature in my opinion is horrible.

  101. Laina says:

    I agree with the take down systems and everything else. However, if artists are going to start screaming about theft of their works, they shouldn't upload them onto the internet. They have the right to yes, and the thefts are wrong, yes but its still the artists faults at the end of the day. I too am an artist, however there has been a few people to take my work without asking however, i'm not stupid enough to upload full sized pieces, I hae the originals and can easily sue if I need to.Most people will disagree with me, even shout at me for my opinion, however I agree with this petition and hope it ends successfully.

  102. Izzy~* says:

    im sick of finding peoples art all over photo bucket.
    i really hope that photobucket changes 3:

  103. Laina says:

    I agree with the take down systems and everything else. However, if artists are going to start screaming about theft of their works, they shouldn't upload them onto the internet. They have the right to yes, and the thefts are wrong, yes but its still the artists faults at the end of the day. I too am an artist, however there has been a few people to take my work without asking however, i'm not stupid enough to upload full sized pieces, I hae the originals and can easily sue if I need to.

    Most people will disagree with me, even shout at me for my opinion, however I agree with this petition and hope it ends successfully.

  104. Laina says:

    I agree with the take down systems and everything else. However, if artists are going to start screaming about theft of their works, they shouldn't upload them onto the internet. They have the right to yes, and the thefts are wrong, yes but its still the artists faults at the end of the day. I too am an artist, however there has been a few people to take my work without asking however, i'm not stupid enough to upload full sized pieces, I hae the originals and can easily sue if I need to.Most people will disagree with me, even shout at me for my opinion, however I agree with this petition and hope it ends successfully.

  105. Izzy: As do we all. It seems to be what most of PB is these days for some reason.

    Lillian: I stopped using PB too but I can't say it was because of this. If you have a Mac and want to use a more responsible service, I highly recommend Skitch.com. It's a great program and a great service.

    Jennifer: Thank you for your support. Hopefully, with enough people like yourself, we can force real change.

    Laina: I do indeed disagree with you and would love to discuss this in more detail later, but this is not the time nor the place. Right now what is important is that artists work together on this issue. I am glad that you support it. Thank you.

  106. Izzy: As do we all. It seems to be what most of PB is these days for some reason.Lillian: I stopped using PB too but I can't say it was because of this. If you have a Mac and want to use a more responsible service, I highly recommend Skitch.com. It's a great program and a great service.Jennifer: Thank you for your support. Hopefully, with enough people like yourself, we can force real change.Laina: I do indeed disagree with you and would love to discuss this in more detail later, but this is not the time nor the place. Right now what is important is that artists work together on this issue. I am glad that you support it. Thank you.

  107. Lillian-Lotus Buccola says:

    I stopped using Photobucket sometime back. And I’m already in the middle fo relinking and editing some thigns that I have permission to use for a couple of things. I’m doing my own part. Let’s see Photobucket do it’s own now!

  108. I stopped using Photobucket sometime back. And I’m already in the middle fo relinking and editing some thigns that I have permission to use for a couple of things. I’m doing my own part. Let’s see Photobucket do it’s own now!

  109. Izzy: As do we all. It seems to be what most of PB is these days for some reason.

    Lillian: I stopped using PB too but I can’t say it was because of this. If you have a Mac and want to use a more responsible service, I highly recommend Skitch.com. It’s a great program and a great service.

    Jennifer: Thank you for your support. Hopefully, with enough people like yourself, we can force real change.

    Laina: I do indeed disagree with you and would love to discuss this in more detail later, but this is not the time nor the place. Right now what is important is that artists work together on this issue. I am glad that you support it. Thank you.

  110. Haru-chans says:

    I've never had my art stolen, or atleast I don't know about it. But it sure does piss me off when people steal other's art. It's always disappointing to see it happen :/ I usually just watermark everything…I wish you the best of luck!!

  111. Haru-chans says:

    I've never had my art stolen, or atleast I don't know about it. But it sure does piss me off when people steal other's art. It's always disappointing to see it happen :/ I usually just watermark everything…

    I wish you the best of luck!!

  112. Haru-chans says:

    I've never had my art stolen, or atleast I don't know about it. But it sure does piss me off when people steal other's art. It's always disappointing to see it happen :/ I usually just watermark everything…I wish you the best of luck!!

  113. Traci says:

    As an artist, this does disturb me. It is basically catering to art thieves by making it easier for them to claim other’s work as their own. Being able to post art is one thing but being able to instantly make prints? That’s just sickening.

  114. Traci says:

    As an artist, this does disturb me. It is basically catering to art thieves by making it easier for them to claim other’s work as their own. Being able to post art is one thing but being able to instantly make prints? That’s just sickening.

  115. Haru-chans: Watermarking everything is a good idea in general. As long as you do that, your work is probably safe for the most part. However, definitely keep your eyes open, you never know what you might find.

    Traci: The whole matter is very frustrating but I am grateful for people like yourself supporting this!

  116. Haru-chans: Watermarking everything is a good idea in general. As long as you do that, your work is probably safe for the most part. However, definitely keep your eyes open, you never know what you might find.Traci: The whole matter is very frustrating but I am grateful for people like yourself supporting this!

  117. Lunah says:

    I support this petition. I doubt any of my art would be stolen, because I'm no Picasso, but I know tons of people have had their art stolen by means of photobucket. I have an account on photobucket, with my pictures only, so it's not like I hate the place. I support this petition, basically. Yay for petitions!

  118. Lunah: Thank you for your support, but don’t think that your art may not some day be stolen, if it hasn’t already. As artists, we are always hardest on our own creations…

  119. Lunah says:

    I support this petition. I doubt any of my art would be stolen, because I’m no Picasso, but I know tons of people have had their art stolen by means of photobucket. I have an account on photobucket, with my pictures only, so it’s not like I hate the place.

    I support this petition, basically. Yay for petitions!

  120. Lunah: Thank you for your support, but don’t think that your art may not some day be stolen, if it hasn’t already. As artists, we are always hardest on our own creations…

  121. Nichole says:

    I support this petition. To those who upload, I say:

    No.

  122. Nichole says:

    I support this petition. To those who upload, I say:No.

  123. Nichole: Thank you very much for your support!

  124. Steff says:

    This is truly an issue that should be attended to!It's so very wrong to steal people's hard work and dedication.All their blood and sweat goes into producing nice work for people,and then someone completely selfish goes and steals it,and then does not give any credit to the REAL artist!Frankly it's sick.

  125. Steff says:

    This is truly an issue that should be attended to!
    It’s so very wrong to steal people’s hard work and dedication.
    All their blood and sweat goes into producing nice work for people,
    and then someone completely selfish goes and steals it,
    and then does not give any credit to the REAL artist!
    Frankly it’s sick.

  126. Steff: Thank you for your support and I have to agree with you. It is sick how deep it goes sometimes.

  127. [...] If you’re new here and find this article useful, please consider subscribing to my RSS feed. Thank you for visiting!After several emails directly to PhotoBucket and a call to their parent company Fox Interactive, I have received a reply to my previous story about artists expressing concern over PhotoBucket’s practices. [...]

  128. Brian M says:

    I agree 100%. If they’re able to do this “fingerprint” thing with videos, there should be no problem doing it with submitted art and photography. =D

  129. Brian M says:

    I agree 100%. If they’re able to do this “fingerprint” thing with videos, there should be no problem doing it with submitted art and photography. =D

  130. Brian: Thank you for your support, hopefully they’ll see that and correct the system.

  131. Brian: Thank you for your support, hopefully they’ll see that and correct the system.

  132. Laura says:

    I stopped using PhotoBucket a while ago and started using omgimages.com. Issues like this make me glad that deviantART has an option that watermarks your picture automatically. After reading this, I think I’ll probably upload anything nice from now on with a watermark. Thanks for this. Do you have any other tips regarding how to help keep your art safe?

  133. Laura says:

    I stopped using PhotoBucket a while ago and started using omgimages.com. Issues like this make me glad that deviantART has an option that watermarks your picture automatically. After reading this, I think I’ll probably upload anything nice from now on with a watermark. Thanks for this. Do you have any other tips regarding how to help keep your art safe?

  134. Laura: Thank you for the information. For the record, the site is omgimages. net, not .com. It's an interesting site but I personally would favor Flickr or Webshots. Since I work largely with screengrabs, I work with Skitch.com the most.

    As far as tips go, the watermark is best if you are comfortable with it. Also, keep your images lower resolution if possible. The higher the resolution, the bigger they can be printed.

    Also, be sure to edit your EXIF data in your image to include your personal information. It may or may not make the image more searchable, but it can definitely help you prove ownership if needed.

    Hope that helps!

  135. Laura: Thank you for the information. For the record, the site is omgimages. net, not .com. It's an interesting site but I personally would favor Flickr or Webshots. Since I work largely with screengrabs, I work with Skitch.com the most.As far as tips go, the watermark is best if you are comfortable with it. Also, keep your images lower resolution if possible. The higher the resolution, the bigger they can be printed.Also, be sure to edit your EXIF data in your image to include your personal information. It may or may not make the image more searchable, but it can definitely help you prove ownership if needed.Hope that helps!

  136. Laura: Thank you for the information. For the record, the site is omgimages. net, not .com. It’s an interesting site but I personally would favor Flickr or Webshots. Since I work largely with screengrabs, I work with Skitch.com the most.

    As far as tips go, the watermark is best if you are comfortable with it. Also, keep your images lower resolution if possible. The higher the resolution, the bigger they can be printed.

    Also, be sure to edit your EXIF data in your image to include your personal information. It may or may not make the image more searchable, but it can definitely help you prove ownership if needed.

    Hope that helps!

  137. It honestly shocks me how many people out there really don't understand or care that stealing art is wrong. I personally have no problem with fans who just want to blog something they saw on my site and who properly credit me and link back, but most of the people who take these images don't seem to be doing it for that purpose. They don't look at my paintings and see an artist's hard work. They just see something pretty that they can cut up and use to make blinkies for their My Space. Many people I find using or reposting my work honestly seem to feel that any image found on the internet is "part of the public domain" and that they are free to take anything they like and do what they want with it…. share it, sell it, chop it up into pieces and make art of their own with it… anything. Practices like the photo-printing service Photobucket has going on just make it all the easier for thieves to hold on to this attitude.Honestly, it is hard for me to see where Photobucket wouldn't have even BIGGER problems because of this at some point down the road. You'd think bigger corporations and such that make millions of dollars selling licensed images of copyrighted characters would be upset if services like this become a trend. For example, what's to stop someone now if they want Harry Potter merchandise from just uploading a bunch of images to their Photobucket and making whatever they want instead of buying a mug, a shirt, or what have you legitimately? What happens if MILLIONS of people decide to do that?Anyways… I rambled a bit, but really… I originally just wanted to let you know that I happily signed your petition and will be encouraging others to do the same. Keep fighting the good fight.: )

  138. It honestly shocks me how many people out there really don't understand or care that stealing art is wrong. I personally have no problem with fans who just want to blog something they saw on my site and who properly credit me and link back, but most of the people who take these images don't seem to be doing it for that purpose. They don't look at my paintings and see an artist's hard work. They just see something pretty that they can cut up and use to make blinkies for their My Space.

    Many people I find using or reposting my work honestly seem to feel that any image found on the internet is "part of the public domain" and that they are free to take anything they like and do what they want with it…. share it, sell it, chop it up into pieces and make art of their own with it… anything. Practices like the photo-printing service Photobucket has going on just make it all the easier for thieves to hold on to this attitude.

    Honestly, it is hard for me to see where Photobucket wouldn't have even BIGGER problems because of this at some point down the road. You'd think bigger corporations and such that make millions of dollars selling licensed images of copyrighted characters would be upset if services like this become a trend. For example, what's to stop someone now if they want Harry Potter merchandise from just uploading a bunch of images to their Photobucket and making whatever they want instead of buying a mug, a shirt, or what have you legitimately? What happens if MILLIONS of people decide to do that?

    Anyways… I rambled a bit, but really… I originally just wanted to let you know that I happily signed your petition and will be encouraging others to do the same. Keep fighting the good fight.

    : )

  139. It honestly shocks me how many people out there really don't understand or care that stealing art is wrong. I personally have no problem with fans who just want to blog something they saw on my site and who properly credit me and link back, but most of the people who take these images don't seem to be doing it for that purpose. They don't look at my paintings and see an artist's hard work. They just see something pretty that they can cut up and use to make blinkies for their My Space. Many people I find using or reposting my work honestly seem to feel that any image found on the internet is "part of the public domain" and that they are free to take anything they like and do what they want with it…. share it, sell it, chop it up into pieces and make art of their own with it… anything. Practices like the photo-printing service Photobucket has going on just make it all the easier for thieves to hold on to this attitude.Honestly, it is hard for me to see where Photobucket wouldn't have even BIGGER problems because of this at some point down the road. You'd think bigger corporations and such that make millions of dollars selling licensed images of copyrighted characters would be upset if services like this become a trend. For example, what's to stop someone now if they want Harry Potter merchandise from just uploading a bunch of images to their Photobucket and making whatever they want instead of buying a mug, a shirt, or what have you legitimately? What happens if MILLIONS of people decide to do that?Anyways… I rambled a bit, but really… I originally just wanted to let you know that I happily signed your petition and will be encouraging others to do the same. Keep fighting the good fight.: )

  140. Shannon: No worries about the rambling and thank you for your thoughts. I have to agree completely that PB is inviting greater disaster down the road. Searches for Harry Potter, Disney and other known staunchly protected copyrights turn up a large number of results. How long is it until one of them discover the situation and take action.I wouldn't want to be in PBs shoes when that happens.Thank you for your thoughts!

  141. Shannon: No worries about the rambling and thank you for your thoughts. I have to agree completely that PB is inviting greater disaster down the road. Searches for Harry Potter, Disney and other known staunchly protected copyrights turn up a large number of results. How long is it until one of them discover the situation and take action.

    I wouldn't want to be in PBs shoes when that happens.

    Thank you for your thoughts!

  142. Shannon: No worries about the rambling and thank you for your thoughts. I have to agree completely that PB is inviting greater disaster down the road. Searches for Harry Potter, Disney and other known staunchly protected copyrights turn up a large number of results. How long is it until one of them discover the situation and take action.I wouldn't want to be in PBs shoes when that happens.Thank you for your thoughts!

  143. Cyn says:

    I agree with this! even if my art is not up there on someone else’s account, but I agree! Plagarism, Copyright Infringement and whatnot is the main priorty when it comes to PHotobucket!

  144. Cyn says:

    I agree with this! even if my art is not up there on someone else’s account, but I agree! Plagarism, Copyright Infringement and whatnot is the main priorty when it comes to PHotobucket!

  145. [...] Feedback: Do you host your own images or do you hotlink them from sites like PhotoBucket? [...]

  146. Billie says:

    I think it's stupid some people sit there for hours on end looking for drawings to steal! It's pathetic ><I stopped using Photobucket when I read this, it's bad enough getting my art pinched on Deviantart, but on another site aswell! I agree with everything here.

  147. Billie says:

    I think it's stupid some people sit there for hours on end looking for drawings to steal! It's pathetic ><

    I stopped using Photobucket when I read this, it's bad enough getting my art pinched on Deviantart, but on another site aswell! I agree with everything here.

  148. Billie says:

    I think it's stupid some people sit there for hours on end looking for drawings to steal! It's pathetic ><I stopped using Photobucket when I read this, it's bad enough getting my art pinched on Deviantart, but on another site aswell! I agree with everything here.

  149. Even with every precaution I could think of my artwork was taken off my website and uploaded to photobucket by a visitor. That visitor can now do anything he wants with it.

  150. Noel says:

    I’m not a great artist myself, but I would hate to see my better pics being sold. Why let others make money off of my cruddy drawings?

  151. Noel says:

    I’m not a great artist myself, but I would hate to see my better pics being sold. Why let others make money off of my cruddy drawings?

  152. Ian Sarver says:

    I am glad that there are some forward thinking people on DA. The artists that do drawings and all types of things like that deserve better than some talentless individual taking their art and posting it as there own. It is about time that PB changes it policies otherwise the userbase might leave and take their bussiness elsewhere. Thanks again for those who signed the petition.

  153. Ian: Same here, I hope that we can get these rules changed and make some progress in this area!

  154. Edward says:

    I haven’t had my art stolen either but like hell I’m gonna let some retarded douche steal my stuff and get credit for my hard work

  155. Edward says:

    I haven’t had my art stolen either but like hell I’m gonna let some retarded douche steal my stuff and get credit for my hard work

  156. @Edward
    If it does happen, let me know if I can help. I'll gladly do what I can!

  157. @Edward -
    If it does happen, let me know if I can help. I’ll gladly do what I can!

  158. Jay Dunn says:

    I totally agree… it’s so frustrating to have so many talented artists that are trying to make a living off of what they do get ripped by those who upload their stuff to sites like Photobucket or even printing them out themselves… I agree with everyone. There should be a function where you can disable the ‘Buy Prints’ thing, because for one, it’s not Photobucket’s art and they have no right to be selling prints of someone’s art that they have no permission to sell.

  159. [...] Who can print your photos: Does not actually disable printing of photos, just the ability for users to order prints via the Flickr partnership with Qoop. Users can still print the images themselves, especially if they can download the full-sized images. On the other hand, it is still much better than Photobucket. [...]

  160. [...] in January, I wrote a post detailing the reasons why many artists were frustrated with Photobucket and their approach to copyrighted [...]

  161. [...] Jonathan Bailey over at PlagarismToday hasn’t given up and gone quietly into the night on the Photobucket issue. He’s put together a great video on why we are concerned over Photobucket’s policies [...]

  162. Lynne says:

    There should be a way for photographers to give permission to someone who would like to use a photo on a blog or website, with the photographer's knowledge. And a copyright notice, but NOT to make money on the picture. Ever.

    Lynne

  163. Lynne says:

    There should be a way for photographers to give permission to someone who would like to use a photo on a blog or website, with the photographer’s knowledge. And a copyright notice, but NOT to make money on the picture. Ever.
    Lynne

  164. Mayra says:

    I think that photobucket is a brilliant concept that could have been a marketing haven for artists and photographers. The site could of been arranged by artists where the works would appear for people to use. The images should all be small enough to view but not large enough to use commercially. All web resolution so that they can only be used for the web. I am sure that artists and photographers have plenty of images stored somewhere they are not using. Why not use them for marketing. I'm a blogger and I do not advertise on my blog, so I am not profiting from any of the images I use from photobucket on my blog. I would very much like to give credit to whomever the image belongs to, but that info is not available. All I can credit is photobucket and I do.

    Bloggers need a site they can join where they pay a membership to use images for their blogs. I don't know why artists and photographers have not done this. Why haven't artists and photographers approached for example wordpress to provide such service for their millions of members. As great as photobucket is, there's a lot of stuff that I don't care to look at in addition to being very time consuming to go through tons of stuff I don't want. I think that there is a great opportunity being missed here not only by photobucket, but the artists and photographers themselves.

  165. Mayra: I would take a look at Divshare for embedding and Photrade for marketing and selling.

    Hope that helps!

  166. Mayra says:

    I think that photobucket is a brilliant concept that could have been a marketing haven for artists and photographers. The site could of been arranged by artists where the works would appear for people to use. The images should all be small enough to view but not large enough to use commercially. All web resolution so that they can only be used for the web. I am sure that artists and photographers have plenty of images stored somewhere they are not using. Why not use them for marketing. I’m a blogger and I do not advertise on my blog, so I am not profiting from any of the images I use from photobucket on my blog. I would very much like to give credit to whomever the image belongs to, but that info is not available. All I can credit is photobucket and I do.

    Bloggers need a site they can join where they pay a membership to use images for their blogs. I don’t know why artists and photographers have not done this. Why haven’t artists and photographers approached for example wordpress to provide such service for their millions of members. As great as photobucket is, there’s a lot of stuff that I don’t care to look at in addition to being very time consuming to go through tons of stuff I don’t want. I think that there is a great opportunity being missed here not only by photobucket, but the artists and photographers themselves.

  167. Mayra: I would take a look at Divshare for embedding and Photrade for marketing and selling.

    Hope that helps!

  168. Mayra says:

    Thank you Jonathan:

    I checked both of those sites and they're not what I am envisioning. For instance you need to get invited to join Phototrade. You see the problem that we really have is that people are more concerned about protecting their work than of making a successful and viable bussiness of their work. And the people who have the technology are not thinking about the rights of the artists, but on how to attract millions of members in advertising dollars. No one should profit from somebody else's work, but to think that you can control this in any way with technology such as the internet is futile. What ends up happening is that artists end up getting their work stolen and making no money anyway. We should all have learned from the music industry's failure to take appropriate action to prevent the loss of millions in revenue from record sales. Once you get people used to not paying for something, it is very difficult to change that mindset, but you know it can be done because water is free and people still pay for it even when their own tap water is cleaner than what they're buying at the store.

    Going after Photobucket is not going to change anything. Photobucket is a cyberspace playpen for people. It was never meant for for professional or commercial use. What needs to be done is to develop a service that does work and where everybody is benefiting. I believe that it can be done, but the mindset needs to change and someone with resources who cares about doing what is right to step up to the plate.

    Thanks for your help.

  169. [...] the latest Photobucket Video went live and it seems to be doing very well. Though not as popular as the original article, it is garnering a great deal of attention on forums and other artist [...]

  170. Mayra says:

    Thank you Jonathan:

    I checked both of those sites and they’re not what I am envisioning. For instance you need to get invited to join Phototrade. You see the problem that we really have is that people are more concerned about protecting their work than of making a successful and viable bussiness of their work. And the people who have the technology are not thinking about the rights of the artists, but on how to attract millions of members in advertising dollars. No one should profit from somebody else’s work, but to think that you can control this in any way with technology such as the internet is futile. What ends up happening is that artists end up getting their work stolen and making no money anyway. We should all have learned from the music industry’s failure to take appropriate action to prevent the loss of millions in revenue from record sales. Once you get people used to not paying for something, it is very difficult to change that mindset, but you know it can be done because water is free and people still pay for it even when their own tap water is cleaner than what they’re buying at the store.

    Going after Photobucket is not going to change anything. Photobucket is a cyberspace playpen for people. It was never meant for for professional or commercial use. What needs to be done is to develop a service that does work and where everybody is benefiting. I believe that it can be done, but the mindset needs to change and someone with resources who cares about doing what is right to step up to the plate.

    Thanks for your help.

  171. Sarah Warmouth says:

    This is exactly the reason why I don’t feel comfortable with uploading my newer works online. I’d like to sell my stuff, but if anyone can just take my work and print it out, then that’s too much of a risk. It’s always said that copying is the greatest form of flattery, but plagiarism isn’t.

  172. Katy A. says:

    I know the time that visual artists put into their works and everyday I see that someone is being ripped off or their works displayed on another site, I could not agree more with this solution. Maybe it will teach people to respect what is not theirs and to have the decency to request the things they want rather than stealing them. It’s also true that photobucket is inadvertently making money from prints of stolen images, This take Down, Stay Down system seems to be a logical and successful solution to this issue at hand, so why not handle it in this manner? IThis system makes perfect sense to me …

  173. I’m glad that it makes sense to you and seems fitting. Hopefully we can get this implemented! Thank you for your suppot.

  174. Anon says:

    You should take a look at Piczo. They use many artists work without their permission and redistribute it to fellow Piczo users or make the artwork available for redistribution. Most artists work on Piczo has been lifted from reputable sites, the images turned in to tubes and reused without having purchased a license.

    Piczo work on the theory of fair use but if complaints are made about a particular image, they will take it down but is immediately uploaded again by the owner of the website.

  175. I'll definitely take a look, thank you for the heads up!

  176. jett says:

    I don't see how whether this was enabled or not how it would affect the printing of any digital image. First off, how hard is it even if it was disabled, to copy and paste the image into your own account just for the purpose of printing. There is no “fool-proof” solution to this when your picture is on any site. What could work for some people who have expessed concern over their media being “stolen” and uploaded to this site, if photobucket added some server side tracking of images and comparing them to a no-allow list, although writing something like this obvioulsy would be quite hard to catch all instances. Although as a fellow artist I take a more of an “open source” approach, I can see how this would be quite inconvenient for people who are trying to make some cash off of your art. My best of luck to you.

  177. While I agree that it is possible to print an image from anywhere through any means, what is unnerving is that A) Photobucket is actively profiting from said printing of likely infringing issues B) That they are providing commercial-quality printing. Those are my biggest issues.

    On that note though, your solution sounds a great deal like the “take down stay down” system I mentioned in the article. They use it actively on Myspace for videos just not on PB for images. I agree it won't catch everything but it is a step in the right direction.

    Thank you for your feedback!

  178. PB User says:

    This is ridiculous. Even “IF” PhotoBucket will change their policy to soften the problems every artist encounter with, it WILL NOT stop the problem, (artists are not the first on the list, how about music, movies, and other media). Next day another similar to PB site will be run out of Zair, Chad, or Malasia. So that petion is DEAD!!!

  179. doug says:

    ahhh…photobucket and myspace…the last bastions of censorship in america

  180. [...] then decided to try Photobucket, an image sharing service I continue to have many sharp disagreements with, taking a similar set of steps that I did with Imageshack. However, once again, both the raw and [...]

  181. [...] Bailey, J 2008, ‘Artists Express Concern Over PhotoBucket’, Plagiarism Today, 15 January, viewed 12 October 2008, http://www.plagiarismtoday.com/2008/01/15/artists-express-concern-over-photobucket/ [...]

  182. myspace owns photobucket? since when! valley wag: http://tinyurl.com/22n5vt and PT on copyright issues: http://tinyurl.com/2by6gv

  183. Walter says:

    Wait, so <a href="http://www.deviantart.comis” target=”_blank”>www.deviantart.comis connected with Photobucket. So anything an artist puts on there will be on Photobucket as well. It is nice that deviantart has watermark options but do they let users know that their works can end up being printed on Photobucket? What if you want to sell prints on deviantart would'nt the watermark get in the way? Anyone know?

  184. Walter says:

    Wait, so http://www.deviantart.comis connected with Photobucket. So anything an artist puts on there will be on Photobucket as well. It is nice that deviantart has watermark options but do they let users know that their works can end up being printed on Photobucket? What if you want to sell prints on deviantart would'nt the watermark get in the way? Anyone know?

  185. dA is not related to PB in any way. What happens is that PB users seem to routinely put up dA images without permission. That is where the problem begins.

  186. [...] However, this controversy seems poised to only become increasingly ugly as the situation has become much more heated in the past 24 hours. To make matters worse, it involves another old foe of the dA community, Photobucket. [...]

  187. Cara says:

    i agree completely. people constantly steal art from real art sites and post it without permission. it's really annoying.

  188. Cara says:

    okay, first deviantArt is NOT connected to Photobucked. what they upload is not put on Photobucket right away. not until an art thief comes along and illegally puts it up on Photobucket. also, if you buy something with a watermark, the print wouldn't have it (I think)that clear things up?

  189. It's even more annoying when one factors in the PB sells prints and so forth of images in their galleries. Scary stuff…

  190. Robert says:

    I'd like to comment about the technical measures you are proposing. Firstly the printing issue, while I feel your pain I would note that a modern colour laser eg:http://www.lexmark.com/lexmark/product/home/108…..is very cheap and able to produce prints that an untrained eye will not be able to distinguish from professional prints. And a print that is "good enough" can often be produced from almost any inkjet printer.Because of this I would say a better solution to this issue would be notification, so the uploader is notified if the image is passed (directly) to the printing option. They can obviously do nothing about indirect or local printing.As for fingerprinting, Marcus said it a year ago, it's silly, just because something exists for video does not mean that the same technique will be effective for a still image. The simplest reason is that it's a lot easier to do a minor edit to an image than it is to a video.

  191. Regarding the printing issue, I agree that any decent home printer or even Walgreens can do a respectable job, the difference though is that, by using Qoop and Photobucket, those sites are profiting from the infringement. You can't stop local printing, that is very true, but there is no reason for Qoop and Photobucket to turn a direct profit selling infringing prints, where at least printer makers earn their money selling printers.The fingerprinting issue has been licked elsewhere. When a company like Tineye, which is a tiny fraction the size of PhotoBucket and Fox can do very good fingerpriting, even when images are editied, it defeats that argument. See also PicScout for this one.

  192. Monica Handy says:

    How do you get permission from the artist, in order to use their work?

  193. Solomon says:

    What concerns me about Photobucket, less than the issues with plagiarism, is that they tend to remove images without notice. Plus they remove all information on that image so you never know what or why they removed an image. They just randomly remove stuff and leave an ugly Photobucket icon to let you know what kind of bastards they are. Their censorship rules are very large and too rigid.

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