Coldplay Admits Plagiarism

In a recent interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Coldplay front man Chris Martin has admitted to plagiarizing many, if not most, of the songs he wrote. Specifically, Chris said:

“We’re definitely good, but I don’t think you can say we’re that original,” he notes. “I regard us as being incredibly good plagiarists.”

In another article, the song “Fix You” was specifically mentioned as being a copy of Elbow’s “Grace Under Pressure”. To that, guitarist Jonny Buckland had this to say.

“We’ve never so directly stolen off anyone before. We’ve never paid for our plagiarism.”

Since I don’t listen to the bands involved and can’t say if this is true plagiarism or just a case of them being “hevaily inspired by”, I can’t really pass any judgment. However, despite that and this not being a case of Internet plagiarism, it’s worth noting for several reasons.

First is that it could indicate a shift in the views on plagiarism in the artistic community. Despite this very open admission and some very wide exposure regarding it, Coldplay has seen no backlash from its fans, from the bands that it “stole” from or the media.

Second is that it might become a justification in other plagiarists minds. Personally, I wonder if the “Coldplay excuse” will become common, no matter how irrational or legally unfounded it might be.

Finally, it shows just how deep plagiarism has worked its way into our artistic society when even the number one band admits to engaging in it. Those of us with original content and wish to protect it against misuse are facing something far more pervasive than previously imagined.

After all, if Coldplay does, who else does?

83 Responses to Coldplay Admits Plagiarism

  1. emma says:

    and they stole from creaky boards. if it's not original, then give it up. either write original freaking material, or go learn a trade hacks. coldplay are hacks. doesn't anyoen write their own stuff anymore? jesus.

    • @emma
      I am not going to comment on the recent scandal but I do want to point out for all that are visiting this entry for the first time that this is a post from 2005 about another article regarding ColdPlay. I've since shifted the focus of this site to help Webmasters deal with plagiarism of their own work and less on plagiarism scandals such as this. I may talk about it in a post tomorrow but it will only be briefly.

      Thank you all for your understanding.

    • Ethan says:

      They did not steal from Creaky Boards, if Martin even was at the show it was 6 months after Viva La Vida was demoed (it was demoed March, the show was in October)

  2. emma says:

    and they stole from creaky boards. if it’s not original, then give it up. either write original freaking material, or go learn a trade hacks. coldplay are hacks. doesn’t anyoen write their own stuff anymore? jesus.

    • My Name is Michael says:

      Hey man we write our own stuff. We take pride in it, and we have to say that we are dissapointed to hear what has become of coldplay and the respect we used to have for them.

    • SteveF says:

      I just read that Joe Satriani is thinking of bringing these guys to court too. I went and played his song "If I could Fly"- And yes they lifted parts from it. I was shocked and then started doing more research and realized this was nothing new with them.

  3. @emma -
    I am not going to comment on the recent scandal but I do want to point out for all that are visiting this entry for the first time that this is a post from 2005 about another article regarding ColdPlay. I’ve since shifted the focus of this site to help Webmasters deal with plagiarism of their own work and less on plagiarism scandals such as this. I may talk about it in a post tomorrow but it will only be briefly.

    Thank you all for your understanding.

  4. Jimmy Corkhill says:

    It wouldn't be the first time they've done this. Listen to the Coldplay song "Talk" from the X&Y album (if you can stomach Chris Martin warbling like a cut price Bono). Then listen to Kraftwerk's "Computer Love". They just lifted the Kraftwerk melody directly, and added their own lame lyrics. I agree with emma just give up you talentless hacks…

  5. Websurfer says:

    I'm guessing you shifted this site's focus in order to get more hits. There is a huge plagiarism scandal involving Coldplay. When you search "coldplay+plagiarism", your website is the first hit.

    You may want to take advantage of that fact.

    • @Websurfer
      Actually, I didn't do it to get more hits. I had three reasons for doing it.

      1) Legal reasons. If you call someone a plagiarist and it works out that they aren't, you can be sued for defamation or bring other trouble to your doorstep. It's dangerous, especially when the terms and laws are very vague.

      2) Drama. Though the Coldplay case in 2005 wasn't an example. Almost every time I covered a story it brought a lot of drama to the site. It wasn't worth it and it didn't help anyone. My goal has always been to help Webmasters and content creators, not be a shaming system.

      3) Consulting. I make my living off of my consulting practice and these types of controversies don't really speak to the customers that pay my bills.

      My goal here is to help people and I actually don't get much site traffic at all. I see that as fine. I get a full time living out of the site and I get to help a lot of good people. That is far more than what most bloggers can say…

      I can't complain.

  6. Jimmy Corkhill says:

    It wouldn’t be the first time they’ve done this. Listen to the Coldplay song “Talk” from the X&Y album (if you can stomach Chris Martin warbling like a cut price Bono). Then listen to Kraftwerk’s “Computer Love”. They just lifted the Kraftwerk melody directly, and added their own lame lyrics. I agree with emma just give up you talentless hacks…

  7. Websurfer says:

    I’m guessing you shifted this site’s focus in order to get more hits. There is a huge plagiarism scandal involving Coldplay. When you search “coldplay+plagiarism”, your website is the first hit.

    You may want to take advantage of that fact.

  8. @Websurfer -
    Actually, I didn’t do it to get more hits. I had three reasons for doing it.

    1) Legal reasons. If you call someone a plagiarist and it works out that they aren’t, you can be sued for defamation or bring other trouble to your doorstep. It’s dangerous, especially when the terms and laws are very vague.

    2) Drama. Though the Coldplay case in 2005 wasn’t an example. Almost every time I covered a story it brought a lot of drama to the site. It wasn’t worth it and it didn’t help anyone. My goal has always been to help Webmasters and content creators, not be a shaming system.

    3) Consulting. I make my living off of my consulting practice and these types of controversies don’t really speak to the customers that pay my bills.

    My goal here is to help people and I actually don’t get much site traffic at all. I see that as fine. I get a full time living out of the site and I get to help a lot of good people. That is far more than what most bloggers can say…

    I can’t complain.

  9. steve says:

    I don’t think that coldplay were totally meaning it when they said that because I don’t think I have ever heard a song that sounds similar to any coldplay songs before, really. Besides, they’ve never ever been sued for it and they have only just been blamed for plagiarism and it is a hell of a loose case for Creaky Boards.

  10. Skullet says:

    Most modern bands are guilty of the same thing Coldplay are being slated for here. The only difference being that Coldplay were big enough to admit it. As to the Creaky Board BS, its a smart move by the Creaky Boards – make some claims of plagiarism against the current top selling band, then later apologise and say you were kidding. Suddenly a band that no one has heard of or cares about becomes well known.

    Also the greatest thing about Coldplay is the way they wind up bitter people, most people are happy to see others doing well, but for some people it brings out the worst in them

  11. Research makes perfect says:

    First, Jimmy, Coldplay received permission from Kraftwerk to use the main riff from “Computer Love” for “Talk”. Kraftwerk is properly credited within the liner notes of X&Y.

    Second,with the Creaky Boards incident, the lead singer just admitted that he made speculative accusations and has backed off from them. Read here: http://tinyurl.com/48j8ne

    Third, Martin has openly admitted his appreciation for Elbow, especially its track “Grace Under Pressure”. He even spoke about it in an interview with Elbow’s lead singer Guy Garvey. (http://tinyurl.com/3zo45m) It’s a bit silly to think that Martin would rip off Garvey’s work, even telling it in front of his face. I think the webmaster needs to read between the lines a bit; Martin and co. are known for their tongue-firmly-in-cheek British humour. Don’t just use the CTRL+F to find the word “plagiarism” and assume it’s true, without reading the entire section in context.

  12. Research makes perfect says:

    First, Jimmy, Coldplay received permission from Kraftwerk to use the main riff from “Computer Love” for “Talk”. Kraftwerk is properly credited within the liner notes of X&Y.

    Second,with the Creaky Boards incident, the lead singer just admitted that he made speculative accusations and has backed off from them. Read here: http://tinyurl.com/48j8ne

    Third, Martin has openly admitted his appreciation for Elbow, especially its track “Grace Under Pressure”. He even spoke about it in an interview with Elbow’s lead singer Guy Garvey. (http://tinyurl.com/3zo45m) It’s a bit silly to think that Martin would rip off Garvey’s work, even telling it in front of his face. I think the webmaster needs to read between the lines a bit; Martin and co. are known for their tongue-firmly-in-cheek British humour. Don’t just use the CTRL+F to find the word “plagiarism” and assume it’s true, without reading the entire section in context.

  13. Skullet says:

    Most modern bands are guilty of the same thing Coldplay are being slated for here. The only difference being that Coldplay were big enough to admit it. As to the Creaky Board BS, its a smart move by the Creaky Boards – make some claims of plagiarism against the current top selling band, then later apologise and say you were kidding. Suddenly a band that no one has heard of or cares about becomes well known.

    Also the greatest thing about Coldplay is the way they wind up bitter people, most people are happy to see others doing well, but for some people it brings out the worst in them

  14. zer0 says:

    coldplay should just hang it up!!! they’ve never been any good, and i can’t imagine how they ever got signed in the first place… the first time i heard them i thought it was u2 trying to make a weak comeback. the fact that they plagiarised really doesn’t surprise me in the least. they are 3rd rate on their best day! originality? please!!! none of them should have quit their day jobs!!! quit now while you’re still half way somebody!

  15. Now now now. "Plagiarism" in music is nothing new. In fact, it has only been frowned upon in recent decades — that is, since greedy individuals and record labels wanted to over-protect their work so that they could make as much money from it as possible and sue anyone who threatened that outcome.

    Look at Baroque music: Bach copied tunes off of Buxtehude and Vivaldi; Handel copied and modified many other melodies. It was all viewed as a valid part of musical enterprise. And what about people who re-use folk tunes in commercial music? Are they plagiarising too?

    An important part of what makes music music is repetition and cross-reference, either within or outwith a particular piece. We need to get away from this absurd over-veneration of the "artist" or "composer" and realise that music is something that operates in much more of a flux — a fuzzy dialogue between listener, composer, occasion and tradition.

    So Coldplay copied a tune. Get over it. It's a rubbish tune anyway.

  16. Now now now. “Plagiarism” in music is nothing new. In fact, it has only been frowned upon in recent decades — that is, since greedy individuals and record labels wanted to over-protect their work so that they could make as much money from it as possible and sue anyone who threatened that outcome.

    Look at Baroque music: Bach copied tunes off of Buxtehude and Vivaldi; Handel copied and modified many other melodies. It was all viewed as a valid part of musical enterprise. And what about people who re-use folk tunes in commercial music? Are they plagiarising too?

    An important part of what makes music music is repetition and cross-reference, either within or outwith a particular piece. We need to get away from this absurd over-veneration of the “artist” or “composer” and realise that music is something that operates in much more of a flux — a fuzzy dialogue between listener, composer, occasion and tradition.

    So Coldplay copied a tune. Get over it. It’s a rubbish tune anyway.

  17. Christina Das says:

    I recently heard the song Computer Love by After Dark VA and the song sounds just like Coldplay’s song Talk. These day’s nothing is original.

  18. Lauren says:

    I still stand behind Coldplay fully. I actually just saw them last night. The similarity between the sounds is merely coincidence. And now that the singer is in hot water over his claim about Coldplay, Creaky Boards or whoever they are are starting to change their story. Coldplay has far too much talent to copy someone. They do well enough on their own, as one can see by them selling millions of albums and the creaky boards not even being signed by a label…. its just a cheap idea to get oneself noticed. A lot of people stand tall beside Coldplay and support them…. as do I. Everyone is inspired by other people… its the way it works.

  19. Funny how the concept of 'plagiarism' works sometimes. While I'm not a Coldplay fan, and never have been, I do see the validity of copying what other people are doing to create new works (if you think about it, remixes and open source software wouldn't really exist unless you could grab things or parts of things and repurpose them). Not to mention that in this case, I would assume it was meant more as a snide remark about plagiarism allegations.

    Snide or not though, there is a point to be made here. And it's that copying another person's work should be more about attribution (and attribution's just good manners).

  20. Funny how the concept of ‘plagiarism’ works sometimes. While I’m not a Coldplay fan, and never have been, I do see the validity of copying what other people are doing to create new works (if you think about it, remixes and open source software wouldn’t really exist unless you could grab things or parts of things and repurpose them). Not to mention that in this case, I would assume it was meant more as a snide remark about plagiarism allegations.

    Snide or not though, there is a point to be made here. And it’s that copying another person’s work should be more about attribution (and attribution’s just good manners).

  21. CK says:

    As your ex-husband, I can say without a doubt, you're wrong………..again! What do you mean, merely coincidence? There's no such thing as a mere coincidence. I'm telling you this one more time, they (Stoleplay) took the riff in Joe Satriani's “If I Could Fly” and made it their melody + hook. They used the vocal progression of the Creaky Boards, layered the bottom with synth strings on doubled notes. I can't believe they thought they could get away with this. They must have counted on satch still getting high all the time and not noticing. Then all was left was to pay off or blackmail Creaky's singer; which is what is most likely happening, since the guy's sudden change in story.

  22. Johnny Marr says:

    what about the claim that “Viva la Vida” is a rip-opp of french star Alizee's “J'en ai marre”?

  23. edwoodca says:

    Good points, CK.

    And Satch has noticed… filed suit vs. Coldplay.

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/lifestyleMolt/idUKT

  24. If anyone has access to the ear of someone who knows someone who has access to the ear of Coldplay, please bring the following argument to their attention; this is a sham accusation, and here’s why:

    It’s not plagiarism: both Satriani and Coldplay are making use of one of the most common chord progressions in music, often referred to as the “circle of fifths” by music theorists. Coldplay has no more plagiarized Satriani than Satriani has plagiarized any number of composers who have made use of this extremely common progression (and, I dare say, Satriani knows it), such as, for example, Jean Constantin throughout the 1959 Truffaut film “400 Blows,” as at the beginning of the following clip I found at YouTube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYW21CnBVsU

    Don’t be fooled by the inevitable differences in orchestration: while the instruments and energy and other aspects are different, the _chord progression_ is _identical_: the only difference is that Constantin moves further down the “circle” than Coldplay does.

    There. Case closed. Satriani should be ashamed of himself (so should Coldplay, by the way, for settling for such banal, commercially driven tripe as the song “Viva la Vida” after producing something as inspiring as XX-XY–but I digress).

    Nobody “owns” the circle of fifths any more than they “own,” say, the most common jazz or blues progressions. Get over it, Satriani: Coldplay is successful because they are (when they’re not selling out) great musicians rather than plagiarists.

    Brett Robbins

    • Stevie09 says:

      Brett don't be ignorant, you are fanning the flames by posting information you have no idea about. You are obviously regurgitating information, with some quite substantial errors. They should be noted here.

      1. Music theory, the circle of fifths has nothing at all to do with chord progressions. It is used to find how many flat or sharp notes (accidentals) there are in a given key. I think you are confusing this with Scale degrees and harmony. So you are either trying to pretend you know theory to try and defend your favoured artist or just trying to look smart, either I have no tolerance for.

      2. The chord progression isn't the focus for the Satch suit, it is the main guitar melody which coldplaygerism have taken and used as their vocal melody. It is identical, in tempo, scale, rhythm and direction.

      Believe it or not I do agree with people that say that you cannot claim ownership of a chord progression, afterall the same progressions are used in different songs all the time. Hence we have general guidelines for song making. Using a I-IV-V progression in the Key of A, how many times have I heard that progression, a hell of a lot. However the difference here is that chris martin has lifted the main melody (melodies are more individual, you would be hard pushed to create a similar melody to someone else, let alone exactly the same including temp, rythm etc) from satch's song and made that a core of their song.

      People argue the fact that satch isn't heard of blah blah blah, satriani is a very famous man among guitar players, and his song "If I could fly" is commented by many to be one of his greatest works to date.

  25. edwoodca says:

    Absolutely correct Brett… you can’t copyright a chord progression. [There are only so many ways to play the same chords.]

    I’ve listened to a mash-up of the songs, but did not extend any effort to compare the melodies, etc.

    And that is where past cases have focused their arguments for plagiarism. The melody, arrangement, lyrics, etc., not on chord progressions. And that’s how this case will be scrutinized, because songs are not composed solely of chord progressions.

  26. Simo says:

    This webpage will be receiving lots of hits as a result of the latest Satriani suit. With said affirmations, Coldplay may have dug an even bigger hole for themselves in front of a jury.

  27. Jorjee says:

    It’s the melody…. not the chords fool. You probably don’t even know what the words mean and are a Coldplay fan :) You are correct no one owns the circle of 5ths. But for Coldplay to get a grammy for outright saying they like to steal songs is wrong. Grammy’s are for the real cola, not the folks who photocopy their way through life. Don’t you think we deserve that as music fans?

  28. After all, if Coldplay does, who else does?

    Everyone on Youtube.

  29. By the way, how was your thanksgiving? And gott any big plans for Yuletide?

  30. Elle says:

    For your information, they got permission from Kraftwerk. So before you say anything like that, look it up.

  31. [...] Update: Via comments below, Jose shares Coldplay’s admission of plagiarism in the past in this article. [...]

  32. Pat says:

    Listen to Kraftwerk’s “Computer Love” and then listen to Coldplay’s song “Talk” and be amazed! Kraftwerk came out with “Computer Love” in 1981. It’s really quite remarkable how similar it is – especially the main riff.

  33. Pat says:

    PS: I just read on Youtube that Coldplay DID write to Kraftwerk and did GET permission to use the riff so this is NOT plagarism as I thought – my apologies. I never knew that until now and should have checked all sources before posting the above.

  34. Ethan says:

    They did not steal from Creaky Boards, if Martin even was at the show it was 6 months after Viva La Vida was demoed (it was demoed March, the show was in October)

  35. Kate says:

    I seriously think some of the people who have commented need to get their facts straight before they post.

    I won’t restate the facts posters have already mentioned before, but Coldplay has asked for permission in the past. And Brett Robbins has explained the recent case in these posts. As for the comment of CK, the strings were not synthetic. And the ‘blackmailing’ allegation is simply rubbish. Making allegations and conspiracy theories does not substitute the need for solid facts.

    So please, with your own musical opinion aside, comment about a band’s ‘originality’ only after you have done appropriate research (which means looking up numerous articles, the band itself, etc etc. Not one ‘hate site’ which agrees with your opinion). In the process of trying to put a bad word to a band by false allegations, you humiliate yourself and offend fans with your ignorance.

    Thank you.

  36. Coldplay are theives says:

    And now they are being sued for their plagiarism by Joe Satriani, another artist they ripped off. Isn’t commupence great?

  37. Coldplay vs Satriani? Coldplay is fucked. Check out this blog and its Rolling Stone link from 2005. http://tinyurl.com/674e5b

  38. Max says:

    History repeating itself …

    I’m not a musician, but to me it’s more than just a “chord progression”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ofFw9DKu_I

    Where the Recording Industry Ass. of America when it really matters ???

  39. Kevin says:

    In my opinion everything in life (people, technology, music, nature in general) builds on itself by copying and mimicking things in the past that were successful, appealing, or interesting. Who cares if they don’t come up with 100% original material, they’re entertainers and if you like their music because they switched something old up and made it new and appealing then what’s the problem with that. I think in fact you should congratulate them for that, better then having nothing new to like. And if you don’t like their music then that’s OK but you don’t have to take shots at them personally. There’s better things to complain about.

  40. My Name is Michael says:

    Hey man we write our own stuff. We take pride in it, and we have to say that we are dissapointed to hear what has become of coldplay and the respect we used to have for them.

  41. [...] Bailey of Plagiarism Today did a piece on the ‘05 admittance to plagiarism.  Please note the dates in all of the [...]

  42. Koudspel « says:

    [...] ook deze: http://www.plagiarismtoday.com/2005/07/04/coldplay-admits-plagiarism/. Ze zeggen dat “Fix You” van Coldplay een ripoff zou zijn van “Grace under [...]

  43. 2 Cents says:

    Just want to give my 2 cents about this issue. Anyone here of the opinion like mine. Here is my point: What Coldplay have done by admitting in an mag interview that for writing their song, they got lot of idea from other artist & band. They even mentioned the name of the band for the record (interview). Well, let see it this way. If you are in a band (that is not as famous or well known as Coldplay) that Coldplay said have influenced their works. The implication here is not for you to go out there & sue them. Your band actually get free word of mouth promotion from one of big band out there. It's FOC. WTH is better than this. If I am in this band mentioned, I should be very happy & grateful. I will tell myself, my work have actually influenced or enjoyed by Chris Martin. Coldplay fans might actually check your band out & see if your band is any good. Their fan might become yours. If one believe in the strength of one work, you done need to complain that people stole your work. In the case of Joe Satriani, I figured his music didn't "capture" any more Coldplay fan. So in the end, he is so desperate to profit from this sudden windfall that he have put his own reputation in the line to sue Coldplay. I actually feel he is a bit greedy for his part. Ha ha. I have a good solution for Joe & Coldplay. Why don't Coldplay let Joe Satriani record Viva La Vida for his next album/single. Let Joe keep all the profit from selling this song under his "OWN NAME". Well, that will be fair. Joe will not be accused for profiteering from famous band & Coldplay will pay their price for plagiarism. :)

  44. 2 Cents says:

    Just want to give my 2 cents about this issue. Anyone here of the opinion like mine. Here is my point: What Coldplay have done by admitting in an mag interview that for writing their song, they got lot of idea from other artist & band. They even mentioned the name of the band for the record (interview). Well, let see it this way. If you are in a band (that is not as famous or well known as Coldplay) that Coldplay said have influenced their works. The implication here is not for you to go out there & sue them. Your band actually get free word of mouth promotion from one of big band out there. It's FOC. WTH is better than this. If I am in this band mentioned, I should be very happy & grateful. I will tell myself, my work have actually influenced or enjoyed by Chris Martin. Coldplay fans might actually check your band out & see if your band is any good. Their fan might become yours. If one believe in the strength of one work, you done need to complain that people stole your work. In the case of Joe Satriani, I figured his music didn't "capture" any more Coldplay fan. So in the end, he is so desperate to profit from this sudden windfall that he have put his own reputation in the line to sue Coldplay. I actually feel he is a bit greedy for his part. Ha ha. I have a good solution for Joe & Coldplay. Why don't Coldplay let Joe Satriani record Viva La Vida for his next album/single. Let Joe keep all the profit from selling this song under his "OWN NAME". Well, that will be fair. Joe will not be accused for profiteering from famous band & Coldplay will pay their price for plagiarism. :)

  45. SteveF says:

    I just read that Joe Satriani is thinking of bringing these guys to court too. I went and played his song "If I could Fly"- And yes they lifted parts from it. I was shocked and then started doing more research and realized this was nothing new with them.

  46. Scott Clous says:

    Here's the kicker for me — admission and knowledge of intent. I'm finding this post very interesting.

    1. I write music

    2. I give it away for free (www.clousfamily.com)
    3. I bet it sounds like a lot of other people's stuff — why?

    4. Produced with a software package, and instrument set that thousands of other people have access to–

    5. But am I trying to knowingly copy someone else, and benefit from the similarity, or their work without pay or acknowledgement?

    6. No.

    7. Sadly, I sound like :) a lot of soundtracks — electronic music, etc. Modern recommendation websites WANT me to list who I sound like, and I have no idea.

    7a. Pandora rejected (or at least, hasn't yet posted my first album… lol.) I don't have a fan base large enough to make a difference in anyone's sales….

    7b. I'm harmless, and it's a hobby.

    7c. I sample no one else's stuff, nor do I use anything that belongs to anyone else — it's all instrumental (and perhaps me singing.)

    8. Here's where copyright/plagerism enters in — I put it out for free download, but retain copyright.

    9. Person X downloads it, and uses it (enters a contest, sells it, etc.) then they have violated my clearly expressed intent, and my copyright.

    10. If they brag, hey, we lift tunes from Clousfamily.com — it's pretty clear.

    11. Would it be better if they just asked? Sure.

    12. Could it be easy for them to get permission, yeap — I'm easy, and I'd love more fan base.

    13. Would it be worth suing them if they did it — only if they had as much money as Coldplay….

    14. Rock music space is pretty filled up — if you play, you will sound like someone! The question would be intent, and getting permission, paying royalities if you want to cover — which lots of people do — why not?

    15. As it is, I'd never heard coldplay before the lawsuit (but you will say, dude, you have them listed as a sounds similar too — sadly, I'm trying to get my music heard, make friends, grow my fan base — ditto Katy Perry — never heard her stuff. ) but when I do listen, it's hard for me to say one way or another — lots of people listen to a lot of things. My approach is to generate a tune, and play with it until it sounds nice, via the software I have… it isn't dependant on listening to others, or finding words to lyrics…

    16. Money and lawyers?

    17. Sorry, forgot, there is one song, where I use a sample that was uploaded to a free mashup type website, and I acknowledge the source, the only requirement of using their sample — it's a win-win — I get a cute woman's voice to use, they get the credit & PR value. He's another hobbyist, so we can be friends…

    18. Money and ego would make it hard for us to play.

    19. Contrast this with the Creative Commons movement… as long as people are acknowledged, life is good. I think at the end of the day, recognizing that copying is happening is key. How are you going to respond effectively?

    Enjoy the music!

  47. [...] within the same lifetime, much less within 5 years? The fact that Coldplay has a history with plagiarism doesn’t help their case [...]

  48. Stevie09 says:

    Brett don’t be ignorant, you are fanning the flames by posting information you have no idea about. You are obviously regurgitating information, with some quite substantial errors. They should be noted here.

    1. Music theory, the circle of fifths has nothing at all to do with chord progressions. It is used to find how many flat or sharp notes (accidentals) there are in a given key. I think you are confusing this with Scale degrees and harmony. So you are either trying to pretend you know theory to try and defend your favoured artist or just trying to look smart, either I have no tolerance for.

    2. The chord progression isn’t the focus for the Satch suit, it is the main guitar melody which coldplaygerism have taken and used as their vocal melody. It is identical, in tempo, scale, rhythm and direction.

    Believe it or not I do agree with people that say that you cannot claim ownership of a chord progression, afterall the same progressions are used in different songs all the time. Hence we have general guidelines for song making. Using a I-IV-V progression in the Key of A, how many times have I heard that progression, a hell of a lot. However the difference here is that chris martin has lifted the main melody (melodies are more individual, you would be hard pushed to create a similar melody to someone else, let alone exactly the same including temp, rythm etc) from satch’s song and made that a core of their song.

    People argue the fact that satch isn’t heard of blah blah blah, satriani is a very famous man among guitar players, and his song “If I could fly” is commented by many to be one of his greatest works to date.

  49. simonok says:

    Elbow are one of my fav bands, and I don't really care for coldplay – now I'm going to have to listen to both songs and see what coldplay stole from elbow – perhaps that's why elbow won the mercury music prize.

  50. Cleopatra_R says:

    well, i'll say the fact that coldplay admit to having borrowed aff a few songs, means it can't be plagiarism, can it?

  51. mark says:

    Are you joking? the Creaky boards case is the best case ever!

  52. Michael Holand Shepa says:

    Ask Ringo Starr how many died for the lies of who wrote the songs the Beatles sung. I wrote one, and still suffer this indignity with violence. etc. How many more will be burned? Is a song worth dying for? Will he be more?

  53. Jordan says:

    Well why should someone else benefit for your hard work thats ridiculous

  54. Erik says:

    Christina Das: Kraftwerk originally did “Computer Love” not that other band.

  55. Erik says:

    And what about the claim from Cat Stevens that “Viva La Vida” is a ripoff of his song?

  56. Erik says:

    "Pat – whats that?" – Pat, remember that?

  57. Erik says:

    “Pat – whats that?” – Pat, remember that?

  58. Erik says:

    2 Cents is like 2 Cents short.

  59. charlie says:

    Agreed. That's why I don't have kids.

  60. C K says:

    Kate, its obvious your not a musician. If you were, you'd care more about theft, instead of being technical to the point that they used real strings in the record. The reason I said "synth strings" is because I didn't think any string section worth their salt would knowingly provide music for those lymie thieves. In defense of the players though, most classical/chamber musicians probably are not well versed on Satch; making them unwittingly an accessory to the crime. Don't mean to be technical, but while working as a government official, I saw acts of blackmail routinely. So it would seem it's your ignorance to the workings of the world that will be the source of your humiliation. If you would like to tell Stoleplay I made a false statement about them, please do so. I'm sure you communicate through your fansite, of which you're no doubt a charter member. That's fine. Please tell 'em, you'd be doing me a huge favor. I can't wait to get a seven-figure settlement (like Satch) .

  61. Guest says:

    No music can ever be written that doesn't sound like someone else's music. Why? There's 12 damn notes and I don't care if you flatten, sharpen or play it fast or slow. It's going to sound familiar! If you want to call this phenomenon "plagiarism", then every band has a case to win and lose in a court of law. Chord progressions? Sorry, they've all been done so no more music can ever be made again or it will be plagiarism. And everyone that's ever recorded a song in audible format now owes money to apes and birds that were making those sounds long before humans existed. Let's be more ridiculous. Shall we?

    • Gsdgasgataw says:

      Its more the fact that they've admitted to ripping off all these bands that makes it plagiarizing, and theres still more to do.

    • Farquadvanwinkle says:

      You obviously have little musical understanding, there's really an infinite amount of sounds and chords. There's an unlimited amount of chords, and thus, chord progressions, but you're probably restricting your info to the commonly used chords.
      But really, saying that all music that's been made has been made before is just…stupid. And where the hell did you get the notion of "music has only 12 damn notes" that's beyond wrong, considering theres eI doubt you even know what a "note" is in the world of music

  62. [...] Update: Via comments below, Jose shares Coldplay’s admission of plagiarism in the past in this article. [...]

  63. [...] The band has once said that they were “definitely good, but I don’t think you can say we’re that original,”. And lead vocalist Chris Martin admitted in an interview: “I regard us as being incredibly good plagiarists.” [...]

  64. Guest says:

    I have a question to all those think they know it all abou music out there, is it plagiarism to create a song on the piano and then taking our time to adjust the final touching to it, released it without ever checking up on the millions of songs out there in the world, and be called a plagiarism because it sounds like someone else's song? Remember I'm talking about just messing around with the keyboard without listening to any song while creating musical art. Yes of course it has a big chance of sounding like another song and should I be sued for my own creation that I made up off the keyboard? I mean what have the world come too? I understand listening note by note and switching notes around, my work will still be called plagiarism because I failed to copyrighted right before whatever song that it sounds like right? Great mind think alike people, it's the truth, you can't say only you in this world have created a unique sounds out of how many people out there

  65. [...] may ask: why am I so adverse to Coldplay? And I will simply tell you to read this, watch [...]

  66. BenRacicot says:

    Yes, “guest” post, it is. When anything is being released nationally (or internationally) they should be checked before releasing. Why wouldn’t they be? If I was an Architect and built an amazing building in NY and when it was done it had most of the dimensions of a famous “unnamed” chapel in Rome what would you say? I should have measured every building to make sure I was original? No, I should have known that it was the same or at least far too close to be considered original.

    Maybe it was coincidence? Then in that case they must pay the price for going hugely public with a piece of music they claimed was original.

    Another point: That song is so basic that again yes, they should have checked it with several professional people before branding it as original. Everyone that worked on that album should be embarrassed if they are not further GUILTY.

    Where is Coldplay in 2011? I just wrote an article on this on my site Bandwriter.com.

  67. [...] opinion (forced out from some guys dumb comment on the matter at plagiarismtoday.com) BenRacicot5 [...]

  68. Stefano says:

    Should I enroll in the army against Coldplay for plagiarism?

    Listen to this comparison between “Paradise” and a song I recorded in 1993:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3h5c3VYn3N4

    For a moment I was a little puzzled, but then I thought that some musical ideas will come out with little variations from different minds, at different times, without knowing each other.

    I think there are very few cases of real plagiarism…

Leave a Reply

STAY CONNECTED