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3 Count: BTJunked

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1: Torrent Search Engine BTJunkie Voluntarily Shuts Down

First off today, popular Bittorrent search engine BTJunkie has voluntarily closed, taking the site offline with just a brief notice to users. The site, which made it easy for users to find and download files via Bittorrent was one of the most popular file sharing sites on the Web and one of the top Bittorrent sites. BTJunkie, despite its size, was never directly targeted by law enforcement or copyright holders. However, according to one of the founders, the recent legal action against Megaupload and The Pirate Bay helped prompt the move.

2: Tycoon to Aid “Pirate” Legal Fight Against Extradition to the U.S. on Copyright Theft Charges

Next up today, UK citizen Richard O’Dwyer, who was the former administrator the site TVShack, a site that specialized in providing links to illegal streams of copyrighted content, may have found an unusual ally in his fight to avoid being extradited to the U.S. Alki David, most famous in copyright circles as the founder of video steaming service Filmon, which was recently ordered to stop streaming content from several major TV networks, has offered to pay his legal expenses both in his extradition fight and in the U.S. if he loses. O’Dwyer lost his first appeal to avoid extradition and faces an 10 year prison sentence in the U.S. for criminal copyright infringement even though his alleged crimes aren’t against the law in the UK.

3: Chrysler Hits Possible Copyright Snag with NFL Over Super Bowl Commercial

Finally today, Chrysler struck a cord with it’s 2-minute Super Bowl commercial “Half Time in America”, which starred Clint Eastwood and spoke about a comeback for both Detroit and America. However, the YouTube version of the commercial was pulled down, according to YouTube due to a copyright request from the NFL. Chyrsler said they had no idea why the commercial was pulled, indicating they had no hand in it, but quickly uploaded another version of it and encouraged others to link to it.

Suggestions

That’s it for the three count today. We will be back tomorrow with three more copyright links. If you have a link that you want to suggest a link for the column or have any proposals to make it better. Feel free to leave a comment or send me an email. I hope to hear from you.

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One Response to 3 Count: BTJunked

  1. David says:

    Usual disclaimer – I’m not a lawyer – but I don’t think it can be quite right to say that O’Dwyer would not have committed crimes under UK law. It is a precondition for a UK court to agree to extradition that there should be an extraditable offence – roughly, that the alleged conduct of the person would amount to a serious offence under UK law if the conduct occurred in the UK. (Which is why there was a great deal of argument in the Assange extradition hearing over whether his sexual conduct in Sweden would have constituted a crime in the UK.) Of course, legal definitions may be formulated differently, so there may be nothing in UK law which corresponds exactly to criminal copyright infringement in US law, but I think the court must have been satisfied that some offence would have been committed. As I understand it, the UK prosecuting authorities do not wish to prosecute because the effects of O’Dwyer’s actions, and the relevant evidence, are mainly in the US. Similar issues arose over a UK-based hacker who hacked into the Pentagon’s computers. He is still resisting extradition on the basis that he has Asperger’s syndrome and it would be inhumane to send him to an American prison. I think O’Dwyer is also playing the Aspergers card.

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