Google Accepts Form DMCA Notices for All Services

Google DMCA FormLast year, I talked about how Google had started accepting accepting form DMCA notices for its Blogger service, making it the first service at Google to accept notices directly online.

For those needing to file DMCA notices with Google, this was a vast improvement as the only previous methods widely accepted were fax and postal mail (though I had a workaround for emailing a DMCA notice to Google).

Apparently though, Google was satisfied with the test results and has now expanded its DMCA form to work with nearly all of its various products including Web search, image search, Adsense, Adwords, Android Market, Orkut, Picasa and, strangely, Gmail.

The only service that does not use the form is Google-owned YouTube, which still has its process on the main site (complete with a separate form).

Using the form is also remarkably simple. One just selects the service they wish to report the copyright infringement, select “I have found content that may violate my copyright” and then indicate you are either the copyright holder or a designated agent. Once you do that, Google walks you through the steps of filing the notice, including providing an electronic signature so there is no need to provide a physical signature via fax or postal mail (a previous sticking point with Google).

Testing Google’s DMCA Form

Having used the form a few times since it recently went online, I can say safely that it is very easy and very quick to use. It has drastically cut down on the time required to file a Google DMCA notice, in particular for Web search.

Though you have to be careful to note that each form is slightly different, asking for information unique to that service, they are all pretty self-explanatory and can be completed by a layperson with great ease.

The big drawback I’m seeing is that response time to these notices appears to be a good deal slower than one would expect. One notice I filed with the Blogger team took nearly three weeks to get a clear spam blog removed. I’ve gotten at least one other report of similarly slow responses.

However, I’m putting out an open call for your experiences. If you’ve used this form recently, please let me know what service you reported to and how quick the response was. You can do so either using my contact form if you wish to respond in private or by posting a comment below.

Bottom Line

All in all, I’m happy to see that Google is taking steps to one and improve their DMCA procedure. Streamlining the process not only could mean faster response times for creators, but also less work for Google and a more reliable process.

However, all of this hinges on Google responding to notices in a timely and appropriate manner, as well as Google making sure that the form isn’t overloaded with false complaints, spam or other garbage.

If Google can overcome these issues, then this change could be a great thing for copyright holders of all stripes. That being said, early indications are that they haven’t, though I’m hoping that they are problems they can iron out soon.

I’ll keep everyone posted on what I find out.

14 Responses to Google Accepts Form DMCA Notices for All Services

  1. hankinslawrenceimages says:

    I filed 10 DMCA complaints early last week with Google using the new form. Only got a confirmation email for one that they had received the complaint. As of today – all 10 photos are still on the blogspot blogs that I reported.

    So far – I'm not impressed

    Patty

    • Jonathan Bailey says:

      That seems to be the story I'm hearing from others as well, I'll be doing another story on this next week most likely. Stay tuned!

  2. cybele says:

    You and I emailed about this and I think you buried the lead on this post.

    Google is ignoring DMCA notices. I've filed at least a half a dozen on three different platforms for two different sites (blogger, adsense & search) and it's been over 3 weeks with no action on any of them.

    Also, they're not sending out confirmations. And any good confirmation of a webform should include the content of a webform. If I'm submitting a digital signature on a legal document (under penalty of perjury), a copy of the content should be emailed to me. Their confirmation is just a number – and if I've filed multiples in the same day, I have no idea what that confirmation number is for.

    I have at least 11 active filings with them but only 3 confirmation numbers.

    • Jonathan Bailey says:

      Not trying to bury the lead on this one. I'm just trying to get more information. Before I make allegations that Google is ignoring or poorly handling DMCA notices, I want as much support as possible. Fortunately, between you, Patty and a few images I have, I seem to be gettting a MUCH clearer picture.

      Stay tuned for the full article in a bit…

  3. [...] Today hasĀ  Google Accepts Form DMCA Notices for All Services andĀ  The Problem with the Fifth Fair Use [...]

  4. Tony says:

    I agree, I have sent in several complaints with no response.

  5. [...] works with emails that pass through Gmail or Google Apps. If you send a DMCA notice via a form, as with Google’s new DMCA system, you’ll have to find a different way to keep track of it. It also doesn’t work with [...]

  6. cybele says:

    Okay, finally I have a resolution. My first notice was sent in February, but I got no reply. I did several more notices blanketing Blogger/Adsense with individual URL reports instead of general ones on March 7. I followed up about every 10 days and finally Blogger responded yesterday (one month) by saying they removed several posts. Since there were new infringements + older ones I didn't report, I also replied with a report of those. (In the interim I did track down the blog creator and asked him to remove/stop posting my blog feed with ads & he refused to stop.)

    I gave Blogger a new list 14 other posts and they responded this morning by terminating the blog. The blog in question was up for 1 year and had over 20,000 posts on it – all feed reposts (some were of CC licensed blogs, but other were from major media companies + small bloggers). There were google ads on it and it did have a page load counter that registered over 17,000 hits (my guess would be he made less than $50 on it – but there may have been buried affiliate links or SEO crud).

    • Jonathan Bailey says:

      I've been getting a lot of replies lately too. I'm going to have more on this later but I held off for a bit to see what's going on here. It seems almost as if Google is clearing out the backlog and may be getting caught up…

  7. P I says:

    It seems that Google is also making hard to report many infiringing URLs at once. I was looking at reporting a site that is scraping a few thousands pages of a site of mine and it does not seem viable to report all pages at once.

    How do I go to send Google a DMCA complaint for thousands of pages? Any suggestions.

  8. [...] understandable, especially for long notices, it can be easily avoided by either having a DMCA form, as Google is doing now, or accepting emailed notices. However, several times I’ve gotten requests for a cleartext [...]

  9. [...] be clear, the bulk of the DMCA process remains the same. For most filers, they will use the same DMCA form that Blogger started using last year and not much will change on that [...]

Leave a Reply

STAY CONNECTED

incredible